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Westward Ho!

roseList documents mentioning Westward Ho!
Quotation Citation
Birdlime
Taylor, if this Gentlewomans Husband should chance to bee in the way now, you shall tell him that I keepe a Hot-house in Gunpowder Ally (neere crouched Fryers) and that I have brought home his wives foule Linnen
1.1.6-10
Justiniano
Let a man love Oisters for their water, for women though they shoulde weepe licour enough to serve a Dyer, or a Brewer, yet they may bee as stale as Wenches, that travaile every second tyde betweene Graves ende, and Billingsgate.
1.1.145-149
Justiniano
I have known many suspected for men of this misfortune; when they have walkt thorow the streetes, weare their hats ore their eye-browes, like pollitick penthouses, which commonly make the shop of a Mercer, or a Linnen Draper, as dark as a roome in Bedlam.
1.1.152-156
Tenterhook
Yea sooth, I was offred forty yesterday upon the Exchange, to assure a hundred.
1.2.30-31
Clara Tenterhook
Go into Bucklers-bury and fetch me two ounces of preserved Melounes, looke there be no Tobacco taken in the shoppe when he weighes it.
1.2.39-41
Judith Honeysuckle
Why as stale as a Country Ostes, an Exchange Sempster, or a Court Landresse.
1.2.95-96
Mr. Honeysuckle
Thanks good maister Parenthesis: and Que novelles: what newes flutters abroad? doe Iack-dawes dung the top of Paules Steeple still.
Justiniano
The more is the pitty, if any dawes do come into the temple, as I feare they do.
Mr. Honeysuckle
They say Charing-crosse is falne downe, since I went to Rochell: but thats no such wonder, twas old, and stood awry (as most part of the world can tel.) And tho it lack under-propping, yet (like great fellowes at a wrastling) when their heeles are once flying uppe, no man will save em; downe they fall, and there let them lye, tho they were bigger then the Guard: Charing-crosse was olde, and olde thinges must shrinke aswell as new Northern cloth.
Justiniano
Your worship is in the right way verily: they must so, but a number of better things between Westminster bridge and temple barre both of a worshipfull, and honorable erection, are falne to decay, and have suffred putrifaction, since Charing fell, that were not of halfe so long standing as the poore wry-neckt Monument.
2.1.30-47
Mr. Honeysuckle
To the Custome-house: to the Change, to my Warehouse, to divers places.
2.1.124-125
Justiniano
Marry because the Suburbes, and those without the bars, have more priviledge then they within the freedome: what need one woman doate upon one Man? Or one man be mad like Orlando for one woman.
Judith Honeysuckle
Troth tis true, considering how much flesh is in every Shambles.
Justiniano
Why should I long to eate of Bakers bread onely, when theres so much Sifting, and bolting, and grynding in every corner of the Citty; men and women are borne, and come running into the world faster then Coaches doe into Cheap-side uppon Symon and Judes day: and are eaten up by Death faster, then Mutton and porridge in a terme time.
2.1.163-174
Justiniano
He tooke up Silkes uppon his bond I confesse: nay more, hees a knight in print: but let his knight-hood be of what stamp it will, from him come I, to intreate you, and Mistris Wafer, and mistris Tenterhook, being both my schollers, and your honest pew fellowes, to meet him this afternoon at the Rhenesh-wine-house ith Stillyard. Captaine Whirlepoole will be there, young Lynstock the Alder-mans Son and Heire, there too, will you steale forth, & tast of a Dutch Bun, and a Keg of Sturgeon.
Judith Honeysuckle
What excuse shall I coyne now?
Justiniano
Few excuses: You must to the pawne to buy Lawne: to Saint Martins for Lace; to the Garden: to the Glasse-house; to your Gossips:1 to the Powlters: else take out an old ruffe, and go to your Sempsters: excuses? Why, they are more ripe then medlers at Christmas.
Judith Honeysuckle
Ile come. The hower.
Justiniano
Two: the way-through Paules: every wench take a piller, there clap on your Maskes: your men will bee behind you, and before your prayers be halfe don, be before you, & man you out at severall doores.
2.1.205-223
Birdlime
The troath is my Lord, I gotte her to my house, there she put off her own cloths my Lord and put on yours my Lord, provided her a Coach, Searcht the middle Ile in Pawles, and with three Elizabeth twelue-pences prest three knaves my Lord, hirde three Liveries in Long-lane, to man her
2.2.42-46
Birdlime
the Lob has his Lasse, the Collier his Dowdy, the Westerne-man his Pug, the Serving-man his Punke, the student his Nun in white Fryers, the Puritan his Sister, and the Lord his Lady
2.2.192-194
Monopoly
I’me to sup this night at the Lyon in Shoredich with certen gallants
2.2.235-236
Lynstock
Welcome to the Stilliard faire Ladies.
2.3.2
Goslin
What say you to Black-wall, or Lime-house?
Judith Honeysuckle
Every roome there smels to much of Tar.
Lynstock
Lets to mine host Dogbolts at Brainford then, there you are out of eyes, out of eares, private roomes, sweet Lynnen, winking attendance, and what cheere you will?
2.3.71-75
Justiniano
Where will you meet ith morning?
Goslin
At some Taverne neare the water-side, thats private.
Justiniano
The Grey-hound, the Greyhound in Black-fryers, an excellent Randevous.
Lynstock
Content the Greyhound by eight?
Justiniano
And then you may whip forth two first, and two next, on a sudden, and take Boate at Bridewell Dock most privately.
2.3.102-108
Clare Tenterhook
At the Lyon in Shoredich?
2.3.121
Clare Tenterhook
Hees in town: this night he sups at the Lyon in Shoaredich
3.1.23-24
Mr Tenterhook
meet me at the Counter in Woodstreete
3.1.30
Monopoly
I would make them scud so fast from me, that they should think it a shorter way betweene this and Ludgate, then a condemned Cutpurse thinkes it between Newgate and Tyburne.
3.2.20-23
Whirlpool
I have risen, and departed thence as hungry, as ever came Countrey Atturny from Westminster
3.2.35-37
Monopoly
I will have the haire of your head and beard shaved off for this, and eare I catch you at Grayes Inne by this light law.
3.2.50-52
Justiniano
from that day to this, thers a record to be seene at Croiden
3.3.28-29
Mabel Wafer
Run into Bucklers burry for two ounces of Draggon water, some Spermacaety and Treakle.
3.3.58-59
Mabel Wafer
wil you to Bucklers burry sir?
3.3.76
Justiniano
In Blacke-Friers, there take Water, keepe a loofe from the shore, on with your Masks, up with your sails, and West-ward Hoe
3.3.92-93
Luce
some puny Inn-a-court-men, Ile hold my contribution
4.1.10
Luce
O you are George the drawer at the Miter2.
4.1.62
Luce
A pox on the Tearme, and now I thinke ont, saies a gentleman last night let the pox be in the Towne seaven yeare, Westminster never breeds Cob-webs
4.1.81-83
Birdlime
you went to a Butchers feast at Cuckolds-haven the next day after Saint Lukes day
4.1.102-103
Birdlime
Ile downe to Queene-hive, and the Watermen which were wont to carrie you to Lambeth Marsh, shall carry mee thither
4.1.234-236
Justiniano
To me upon mine honestie, swore you would build me a lodging by the Thames side with a watergate to it: or els take mee a lodging in Cole-harbor.
4.2.78-80
Clare Tenterhook
one that hadde bespoke me of my husband to help me into the banqueting house and see the revelling
5.1.66-68
Clare Tenterhook
be as wanton as new married wives, as fantasticke and light headed to the eye, as fether-makers, but as pure about the heart, as if we dwelt amongst em in Black Fryers
5.1.161-163
Justiniano
this last Christmas a Cittizen and his wife (as it might be one of you) were invited to the Revells one night at one of the Innes a Court
5.4.55-57
Clare Tenterhook
I warrant they walk upon Queen-hive (as Leander did for Hero) to watch for our landing, and should we wrong such kind hearts?
5.4.121-123
Justiniano
saile with the rest of your baudie-traffikers to the place of sixe-penny Sinfulnesse the suburbes.
Birdlime
I scorne the Sinfulnesse of any suburbes in Christendom
5.4.249-251

Notes

  1. See Gossip and Gossips for more information. (TLG)
  2. This toponym refers to what is now Ye Old Mitre Tavern in Holborn, near Hatton Garden. (JP)

References

  • Dekker, Thomas. Westward Ho. The Dramatic Works of Thomas Dekker. Vol. 2. Ed. Fredson Bowers. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1964.
Last modification: 2016-06-04 14:50:40 -0700 (Sat, 04 Jun 2016) (jtakeda)
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MLA citation:

Dekker, Thomas, and John Webster. “Westward Ho!.” The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Web. 24 August 2017. <http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WEST14.htm>.

Chicago citation:

Dekker, Thomas, and John Webster. n.d. “Westward Ho!.” The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed August 24, 2017. http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WEST14.htm.

APA citation:

Dekker T., & J. Webster. (n.d.). Westward Ho!. In J. Jenstad (Ed.), The Map of Early Modern London. Retrieved August 24, 2017, from http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WEST14.htm

TEI citation:

<bibl> <author><persName><surname>Dekker</surname>, <forename>Thomas</forename></persName></author>, & <author><persName><forename>John</forename> <surname>Webster</surname></persName></author>. (<date>n.d.</date>). <title level="a">Westward Ho!</title>. In <editor><persName><forename>J.</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></persName></editor> (Ed.), <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>. Retrieved <date when="2017-08-24">August 24, 2017</date>, from <ref target="http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WEST14.htm">http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WEST14.htm</ref> </bibl>