Contributors

Name Bio
Victoria Abboud
Revenge tragedy student, University of Windsor, Winter 2001. Ms. Abboud completed her MA in English at Wayne State University in 2003 and her PhD at Wayne State University in 2010. She is now an instructor in the arts and education department of Grande Prairie Regional College, Alberta.
Neil Adams
Research assistant, 2010–11. Neil Adams completed a BA (first class honours) in history at the University of Kent, Canterbury (UK) in 2008 and an MA in history at the University of Victoria in 2010. His MA paper analyzed the historiography of Canadian conscripts during the Second World War. A keen historian of early modern London, he is responsible for redrawing the ward boundaries.
Natalie Aldred
Dr. Natalie Aldred is an independent scholar. She specializes in the editing and bibliographical studies of early modern English vernacular texts, as well as book history, early book advertisements, sixteenth-century theatre history, digital humanities, and professional playwrights, notably William Haughton. Her articles, notes, and conference papers explore bibliography, editing, genre, biography, and printers. She is currently editing Haughton’s Englishmen for my Money (for Digital Renaissance Editions), and co-producing, with Joshua McEvilla, an online catalogue of pre-1668 book advertisements in English periodicals (for The Bibliographical Society). She is assistant editor of The Literary Encyclopedia and contributes to the Lost Plays Database.
Ronda Arab
Dr. Ronda Arab (PhD Columbia) is an assistant professor of English at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include intersections of class, gender, and work on the early modern English stage; non-elite culture and its challenges to patriarchy; the role of literature and theatre in the construction of cultural discourse and social practice; and the city of London. She is the author of Manly Mechanicals on the Early Modern English Stage (Susquehanna UP, 2011), an examination of working men in Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and has a recent article in Working Subjects in Early Modern English Drama (Ashgate, 2011). She has also published in Medievaland Renaissance Drama in England, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Renaissance Quarterly.
Stewart Arneil
Programmer at the University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre whomaintained the Map of London project between 2006 and 2011. Stewart was a co-applicant on the SSHRC Insight Grant for 2012–16.
Emma Atwood
Emma Katherine Atwood is a doctoral candidate at Boston College. Her dissertation is titled Domestic Architecture on the English Renaissance Stage. Emma’s articles and reviews have appeared in The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Comparative Drama, Early Theatre, Shakespeare Bulletin, and This Rough Magic. Emma has presented her work for the Northeast Modern Language Association, the Massachusetts Center for Renaissance Studies, the International Marlowe Society Conference, and the Association for Theater in Higher Education, among others. Her research has been funded in part by Alpha Lambda Delta. In 2013, Emma was recognized with a Carter Manny Citation of Special Recognition from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, an award that recognizes interdisciplinary dissertations in architecture. At Boston College, Emma teaches Shakespeare, Poetry, and British Literature. Emma also teaches writing at Framingham State University.
David Badke
Contract programmer at the University of Victoria Humanities Computing and MediaCentre, who created the first version of the multi-layered map (the "experimental map"), based on his image markup and presentation application in 2006.
Neil Baldwin
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA honours student, English Language and literature, University of Windsor.
Benjamin Barber
Benjamin Barber is a PhD student at the University of Ottawa. His recently completed MA research at the University of Victoria analyzed the role of mimetic desire, honour, and violence in Heywood’s Edward IV Parts 1 and 2 and Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale. His current research explores the influence of Shakespearian protagonists on Lord Byron’s characterization of Childe Harold and Don Juan. He has articles forthcoming in Literature and Theology (Oxford UP) and Contagion: Journal of Violence Mimesis and Culture (Michigan State UP). He has also contributed an article to Anthropoetics: The Journal of Generative Anthropology (UCLA).
Mark Bayer
Mark Bayer is Associate Professor and chair of the Department of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He is author of Theatre, Community, and Civic Engagement in Jacobean England (University of Iowa Press, 2011) and numerous articles and book chapters on early modern literature and culture, and on the reception of Shakespeare’s plays.
Suzanne Bebbington
Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2002.
Michael Best
Dr. Michael Best is professor emeritus, University of Victoria, and coordinating editor of Internet Shakespeare Editions.
Tom Bishop
Tom Bishop is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. He is Professor of English at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where he teaches in the English and Drama programmes. He is the author of Shakespeare and the Theatre of Wonder (Cambridge, 1996), the translator of Ovid’s Amores (Carcanet, 2003), and a general editor of The Shakespearean International Yearbook, an annual volume of scholarly essays published by Ashgate Press. He has published articles on Elizabethan music, Shakespeare, Jonson, Australian literature, and other topics, co-produced a full-scale production of Ben Jonson’s Oberon, the Fairy Prince, and sits on the board of the Summer Shakespeare Trust at the University of Auckland. He is currently working on a project entitled Shakespeare’s Theatre Games.
Laurel Bowman
Dr. Laurel Bowman’s area of interest lies specifically in Greek tragedy, a genre she says has inspired countless other works of literature, right up to modern day film and television.
Dr. Bowman persistently highlights the roles of women in these texts, or lack thereof, the construction of gender, and the significance of that construction in any text she looks at.
Some of her research focuses on a recent translation of Homer’s The Iliad by poet Alice Oswald. The poem concentrates only on the death scenes and the similes. Dr. Bowman argues that the translation highlights the depths of human sacrifice, torment, and loss suffered by the foot soldiers, their families. and their communities as a result of the Trojan War.
Another research project focuses on the myth of the sacrificial virgin and its presence in pop culture, specifically the works of writer/director Joss Whedon ofBuffy the Vampire Slayer fame.
She brings her research on Antigone or Electra into the classroom, where her enthusiasm for the subject matter is palpable.
Yan Brailowsky
Yan Brailowsky is a lecturer in early modern literature and history at the University of Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France). His research interestscurrently include prophecy in early modern drama, the history of the reformation, and the relationship between gender and politics in Renaissance Europe. He is the author of The Spider and the Statue: Poisoned innocence in A Winter’s Tale (Presses Universitaires de France, 2010) and William Shakespeare: King Lear (SEDES, 2008), and has co-edited:1970-2010, les sciences de l’Homme en débat (Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest, 2013), ‘A sad tale’s best for winter’: Approches critiques du Conte d’hiver de Shakespeare (Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest, 2011), Le Bannissement et l’exil en Europe au XVIe et XVIIe siècles (Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2010), and Language and Otherness in Renaissance Culture (Presses Universitaires de Paris Ouest, 2008). He is also Secretary of the Société Française Shakespeare and member of the editorial board and webmaster of several French academic websites, furthering his interest in the Digital Humanities and his commitment to Open Access.
Laura Braithwaite
Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2000.
Kim Brown
MA 2001, Windsor; 2000. Funded by the Work Study program.
Jennie Butler
Pageantry student and MA candidate, University of Windsor, Winter 2000.
Cameron Butt
Encoder, research assistant, and copy editor, 2012–13. Cameron completed his undergraduate honours degree in English at the University of Victoria in 2013. He minored in French and has a keen interest in Shakespeare, film, media studies, popular culture, and the geohumanities.
James Campbell
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; research assistant, 2002–03; BA honours student, English Language and Literature, University of Windsor.
Dominic Carlone
Hypertext Student, University of Windsor, Fall 1999; Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2000. Dominic was one of the three students who created the first version of MoEML in 1999.
Melanie Chernyk
Research assistant, 2004–08; BA honours, 2006; MA English, University of Victoria,2007. Ms. Chernyk went on to work at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria and now manages Talisman Books and Gallery on Pender Island, BC. She also has her own editing business at http://26letters.ca.
Glenn Clark
Dr. Glenn Clark (PhD Chicago) is an associate professor in the department of English, film, and theatre at the University of Manitoba. His research interests currently include the relationship between English drama and the post-Reformation pastoral ministry, and the significance of commercialized hospitality in Tudor–Stuart culture. He is the author of articles on Shakespeare and other aspects of early-modern English drama in journals and book collections including English Literary Renaissance, Renaissance and Reformation, Religion and Literature, Shakespeare and Religious Change(Palgrave, 2009), and Playing The Globe: Genre and Geography in English Renaissance Drama (Fairleigh Dickinson/Associated UP, 1998). He is co-editor of the volume City Limits: Perspectives on the Historical European City (McGill–Queen’s, 2010).
Robert Clark
Dr. Robert Clark, MoEML consultant, is reader in English literature at the University of East Anglia. He devised and developed ABES for Routledge (1996–2003) and is the founding editor and software designer of The Literary Encyclopedia, which has been published since 2000 and now comprises over 12 million words in a data structure of over 40 thousand records. He has also recently developed a test-bed site for cultural topography at mappingwriting.com, which is exploring the use of Google Maps for the representation of space in literary texts. His writings in literary history includeHistory, Ideology and Myth in American Fiction; editions of novels by Defoe, Austen, and Fenimore Cooper; and essays on Dickens, Angela Carter, Michael Ondaatje, Henry Fielding, and The Spectator. He also edited The Arnold Anthology of Britishand Irish Literature in English. His major rereading of Jane Austen in relationship to the rise of the free-market, Jane Austen: Transformations of Capital, will be published by Routledge in 2013.
Patrick Close
Undergraduate research assistant and encoder, 2013. Patrick is a fourth-year honours English student at the University of Victoria. His research interests include media archaeology, culture studies, and humanities (physical) computing. He is the current editor-in-chief of The Warren Undergraduate Review.
Joy Cochrane
MA student, Victoria, 2004. Funded by SSHRC Standard Research Grant.
Amy Collins
English 520, Representations of London, University of Victoria, Summer 2008.
Michael Davis
MA candidate, University of Windsor, Fall 2000. Mr. Davis went on to complete an MA in library and information science at the University of Western Ontario.
Marina Devine
ENGL 520, Representations of London, Summer 2008; MA Candidate, English, University of Victoria. Formerly an instructor of literature at Aurora College in Fort Smith, NT, she is now the manager of adult and post-secondary education with the Government of the Northwest Territories. She resides in Yellowknife, NT.
Tara Drouillard
Hypertext and Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2000; Research assistant, 2000–2002. Ms. Drouillard received her MA in English from Queen’s University in 2003 and now works in communications.
Telka Duxbury
Telka is an MA student at the University of Victoria. Since 2010, she has been a research assistant for the Internet Shakespeare Editions.
Mike Elkink
Mike is a graduate of the University of Victoria in anthropology and computer science. During his contract with the Humanities Computing and Media Centre in themid-2000s, he co-developed the TEI encoding guidelines for The Map of Early Modern London with Eric Haswell, redesigned the look of the site. and created the application framework and the database interface using PHP, interfaced with an early version of the eXist XML database. Since working on MoEML, he has contributed to various encoding projects for the Humanities Computing and Media Centre as well as for the electronic textual cultures lab at the University of Victoria. He has continued his career in information technology and is currently the technology administrator for the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.
Natalia Esling
Undergraduate research scholar (URS) 2010–2011, department of English, University of Victoria. Natalia completed her BA honours in English with a major in French in2011. She began an M.Sc. in literature and modernity at the University of Edinburgh in September 2011.
Laura Estill
Dr. Laura Estill is Assistant Professor of English at Texas A&M University. She is editor of the World Shakespeare Bibliography. Her book, Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays, is forthcoming from the University of Delaware Press. Her research interests include early modern English drama, print and manuscript culture, and digital humanities. Her research has appeared in Shakespeare, Huntington Library Quarterly, Early Theatre, Studies in English Literature, ArchBook, Opuscula, and The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare.
Laura was one of MoEML’s earliest contributors, having participated in Janelle Jenstad’s undergraduate course, English 328: Drama of the English Renaissance, at the University of Windsor in 2003.
Jeremy Fairall
Hypertext student, University of Windsor, Fall 1999. Jeremy was one of the three students who created the first version of MoEML in1999.
Althea Fletcher
Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2000.
Ian Gregory
Dr. Ian Gregory is senior lecturer in digital humanities, department of history, Lancaster University.
Aleta Gruenewald
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English and cultural, social, and political thought, University of Victoria.
Paul Hartlen
English 520, Representations of London in Early Modern Literature and Culture, Summer 2008; BA University of Victoria; currently an MA student, University of Victoria.
Eric Haswell
Eric collaborated with Mike Elkink on the creation of the initial schema andencoding guidelines for The Map of Early Modern London.
Peter C. Herman
Peter C. Herman is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. He is Professor of English Literature at San Diego State University. His most recent books include, The New Milton Criticism, co-edited with Elizabeth Sauer (Cambridge UP, 20012), A Short History of Early Modern England (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011), and “Royal Poetrie”: Monarchic Verse and the Political Imaginary of Early Modern England (Cornell UP, 2010). His current projects include a teaching edition of Thomas Deloney’s Jack of Newbury and a book on the literature of terrorism. In Spring 2014, he is teaching a research seminar on Shakespeare that will collectively produce the article on Blackfriars Theatre for the Map of Early Modern London.
Christopher Highley
Chris Highley is a Professor of English at The Ohio State University. He grew up near Manchester in the north of England. After studying English at the University of Sussex, he earned his Masters and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Southern California and Stanford University (1991) respectively. He specializes in Early Modern literature, culture, and history. He is the author of Shakespeare, Spenser, and the Crisis in Ireland (Cambridge University Press, 1997) and Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland (Oxford University Press, 2008), and co-editor of Henry VIII and his Afterlives (Cambridge University Press, 2009). He is currently working on two unrelated projects: the posthumous image of Henry VIII, and the history of the Blackfriars neighborhood in early modern London.
Tracey Hill
Dr. Tracey Hill is head of the department of Englishand cultural studies at Bath Spa University. Her specialism is in the literature and history of early modern London. She is the author of two books: Anthony Munday and Civic Culture (Manchester UP, 2004), and Pageantry and Power: A Cultural History of the Early Modern Lord Mayor’sShows, 1585–1639 (Manchester UP, 2010). She has also published a number of articles on Munday’s prose works, on The Booke of Sir Thomas More, and on late Elizabethan history plays.
Brett D. Hirsch
Dr. Brett D. Hirsch is university postdoctoral research fellow in medieval and early modern studies at the University of Western Australia. He is coordinating editor of Digital Renaissance Editions, co-editor of the Routledge journal Shakespeare, and vice president of the Australian and New Zealand Shakespeare Association (ANZSA). His research interests include early modern English drama, literary and cultural history, digital humanities, and critical editing, and he has published articles in these areas inThe Ben Jonson Journal, Early Modern Literary Studies, Early Theatre, Literature Compass, and Parergon. He is currently working on an electronic critical edition of Fair Em and a monograph study of animal narratives in Shakespeare’s England.
Martin D. Holmes (b. 5 August 1959)
Programmer at the University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre. Martin ported the MOL project from its original PHP incarnation to a pure eXist database implementation in the fall of 2011, and has since been lead programmer on the project, and is also responsible for maintaining the project schemas. Co-applicant on the SSHRC Insight Grant.
Meredith Holmes
Research Assistant, 2013-14. Meredith hails from Edmonton where she completed a BA in English at Concordia University College of Alberta. She is doing an MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at the University of Victoria. In her spare time, Meredith plays classical piano and trombone, scrapbooks, and paints porcelain. A lesser known fact about Meredith: back at home, she has her own kiln in her basement!
Julie Homenuik
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA honours student, English Language and literature, University of Windsor.
Joanna Hutz
Research assistant, 2002–03; BA Honours Student, English Language and Literature, University of Windsor. Ms. Hutz received a Canada Graduate Scholarship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to pursue her MA.
Diane Jakacki
Diane Jakacki is the Digital Scholarship Coordinatorat Bucknell University. Her research specialties include early modern British drama and popular culture, visual rhetoric, digital humanities research and praxis. She extends her research into learning environments as a developer of digital pedagogy approaches to composition, literature, and drama. She is currently editing King Henry VIII for Internet Shakespeare Editions. Jakacki is an Assistant Director of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute and a member of the digital advisory boards for the Records of Early English Drama and Iter.
Janelle Jenstad
Janelle Jenstad, associate professor in the department of English at the University of Victoria, is the general editor and coordinator of The Map of Early Modern London. She is also the assistant coordinating editor ofInternet Shakespeare Editions. She has taught at Queen’s University, the Summer Academy at the Stratford Festival, the University of Windsor, and the University of Victoria. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Early Modern Literary Studies, Elizabethan Theatre, Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism, and The Silver Society Journal. Her book chapters have appeared (or will appear) in Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate, 2007), Approaches to Teaching Othello (Modern Language Association, 2005), Shakespeare, Language and the Stage, The Fifth Wall: Approaches to Shakespeare from Criticism, Performance and Theatre Studies (Arden/Thomson Learning, 2005), Institutional Culture in Early Modern Society (Brill, 2004), New Directions in the Geohumanities: Art, Text, and History at the Edge of Place (Routledge, 2011), and Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives (MLA, forthcoming). She is currently working on an edition of The Merchant of Venice for ISE and Broadview P. She lectures regularly on London studies, digital humanities, and on Shakespeare in performance.
Dalyce Joslin
English 520, Representations of London in Early Modern Literature and Culture, Summer 2008; BA honours, English, University of Victoria; MA candidate, English, University of Victoria; teaching assistant, 2005–07. Dalyce’s research interests include representations of identity, place, and diaspora in Canadian literature. Now that she has completed her MA, Dalyce spends much of her time at the Camosun College library reference desk helping students with their research needs.
Kate McPherson
Kate McPherson is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. She is Professor of English at Utah Valley University. She is co-editor, with Kathryn Moncrief and Sarah Enloe of Shakespeare Expressed: Page, Stage, and Classroom in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (Fairleigh Dickinson, 2013); and with Kathryn Moncrief of two other edited collections, Performing Pedagogy in Early Modern England: Gender, Instruction, and Performance (Ashgate, 2011) and Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate, 2008). She has published numerous articles on early modern maternity in scholarly journals as well. An award-winning teacher, Kate is also Resident Scholar for the Grassroots Shakespeare Company, an original practices performance troupe begun by two UVU students.
Kathryn Moncrief
Kathryn M. Moncrief holds a Ph.D in English from the University of Iowa, an M.A. in English and Theatre from the University of Nebraska, and a B.A. in English and Psychology from Doane College. She is Professor and Chair of English at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland and is the recipient of the college’s Alumni Association Award for Distinguished Teaching. She is co-editor, with Kathryn McPherson, of Shakespeare Expressed: Page, Stage and Classroom in Early Modern Drama (Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2013); Performing Pedagogy in Early Modern England: Gender, Instruction and Performance (Ashgate, 2011); and Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate, 2007). She is the author of articles published in book collections and journals, including Gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood, Renaissance Quarterly and others, and is also author of Competitive Figure Skating for Girls (Rosen, 2001).
Noam Kaufman
Research assistant, 2012-13. Noam Kaufman completed his Honours BA in English Literature at York University’s bilingual Glendon campus, graduating with first class standing in the spring of 2012. An incoming MA student specializing in Renaissance drama, he is currently researching early modern London’s historic cast of characters and neighbourhoods, both real and fictional.
Shannon Kelly
Shannon Kelly is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. She is an Assistant Professor of English at Fairfield University. Her teaching and research fields include Lyric Poetry, Literary Theory, Ecocriticism, Early Modern Culture, Science Studies, and Renaissance Drama. Her class will prepare encyclopedia entries on the gardens on the Agas map, including the Bear Garden.
Emily Klemic
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English, University of Victoria.
Kane Klemic
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English, University of Victoria.
Alison Knight
English 520, Representations of London, Fall 2005; MA student, English, University of Victoria. Alison received her MA in 2006 and is now completing her doctoral studies at Cambridge University.
Alyssa Knox
English 364, English Renaissance Drama, Spring 2006; BA honours student in English, University of Victoria.
Cornelius Krahn
Revenge tragedy student, University of Windsor, Winter 2001.
Tamara Kristall
English 412, Representations of London; BA honours student, English language and literature, University of Windsor, Fall 2002.
Charlene Kwiatkowski
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English, University of Victoria.
Tye Landels
Encoder and research assistant, 2013 to present. Tye Landels is a BA Honours candidate in the Department of English at the University of Victoria. He is interested in liberal humanist approaches to literature, particularly Shakespeare, as well as the anthropological and sociological functions of narrative and aesthetics.
Jennifer Lo
Having finished her bachelor’s degree at the University of Victoria, Jennifer went on to take a postgraduate degree at King’s College London. She completed her master’s in 2010 and is currently working on a PhD at King’s. Her doctoral project involves early modern non-literary documents and organizational theory.
Mary Ann Lund
Dr. Mary Ann Lund is lecturer in Renaissance literature at the University of Leicester. She is the author of Melancholy, Medicine and Religion in Early Modern England: Reading The Anatomy of Melancholy (Cambridge UP, 2010), and several articles on seventeenth-century prosewriting and religious literature. She is currently editing volume 12 of The Oxford Edition of the Sermons of John Donne; her volume is of Donne’s sermons preached at St. Paul’s Cathedral in 1626. She also has a research interest in the history of medicine and early modern literature. She teaches a special subject at Leicester on early modern London.
Quinn MacDonald
Undergraduate research assistant and encoder, 2013. Quinn is a fourth-year honours English student at the University of Victoria. Her areas of interest include postcolonial theory and texts, urban agriculture, journalism that isn’t lazy, fine writing, and roller derby. She is the director of community relations for The Warren Undergraduate Review and senior editor of Concrete Garden magazine.
Callie MacKenzie
BA Honours 2003, Windsor; 2002
Sally-Beth MacLean
Dr. Sally-Beth MacLean is professor of English, University of Toronto.
Matt MacTavish
Hypertext student, University of Windsor, Fall 1999; Shakespeare student, University of Windsor, Winter 2000. Matt MacTavish was one of the three students who created the first version of MoEML in 1999.
Paisley Mann
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2008. Paisley Mann completed her MA at the University of Victoria and went on to doctoral work at the University of British Columbia. Her work on Thomas Heywood’s 2 If You Know Not MeYou Know Nobody began with a term paper on the play’s portrayal of illicit French sexuality, a topic she has also researched for the website Representing France and the French in Early Modern English Drama. This topic interests her, although she specializes in Victorian literature, because she frequently works on how Victorian literature portrays France and French culture. She is also a contributor for Routledge’s online database Annotated Bibliography of English Studies.
James Mardock
Dr. James Mardock teaches Renaissance literature at the University of Nevada. He has published articles on John Taylor, the water-poet, on Ben Jonson’s use of transvestism, and on Shakespeare and Dickens. His recent book, Our Scene is London (Routledge 2008), examines Jonson’s representation of urban space as an element in his strategy of self-definition. His chapter in Representing the Plague in Early Modern England (ed. Totaro and Gilman, Routledge 2010) explores King James’s accession and Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure as parallel cultural performances shaped by London’s1603 plague. Mardock is at work on an edition of quarto and folio Henry V for Internet Shakespeare Editions, for which he serves as assistant general editor, and a study of Calvinism and metatheatre in early modern drama. He has also served as the dramaturge for the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival.
Lacey Marshall
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA combined honours student, English language and literature and German, University of Windsor. Lacey went on tostudy speech-language pathology at Dalhousie University.
Kimberley Martin
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA combined honours student, English language and literature and history, University of Windsor. Ms. Martin defended her MA in history at the University of Guelph in October 2004, began doctoral studies at the University of Warwick, and is now completing her PhD at the University of Western Ontario.
Kim McLean-Fiander
Research fellow Kim McLean-Fiander comes to The Map of Early Modern London from the Cultures of Knowledge digital humanities project atOxford University, where she was the editor of Early Modern Letters Online, a freely available open-source digital finding aid and editorial interface for correspondence from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. Prior to that, she held an internship with the curator of manuscripts at the Folger Shakespeare Library, completed a doctorate at Oxford University on paratext and early modern women writers, and worked a number of years for the Bodleian Libraries and as a freelance editor. She has a passion for rarebooks and manuscripts as social and material artifacts, and is interested in the development of digital resources that will improve access to these materials while ensuring their ongoing preservation and conservation. An avid traveler, Kim has always loved both London and maps, and so is particularly delighted to be able to bring her early modern scholarly expertise to bear on the MoEML project.
Sarah Mead-Willis
BA English, University of Alberta; MA library and information science, University of Alberta; MA, English, University of Victoria; English 521, Representations of London, Summer 2008. Mead-Willis won the Lieutenant Governor’s Silver Medal (top master’s other than thesis, all faculties). After her graduation in 2009, she returned to the University of Alberta as a rare book cataloguer.
Sarah Milligan
MoEML Research Affiliate. Research assistant, 2012-14. Sarah Milligan completed her MA at the University of Victoria in 2012 on the invalid persona in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnets from the Portuguese. She has also worked with the Internet Shakespeare Editions and with Dr. Alison Chapman on the Victorian Poetry Network, compiling an index of Victorian periodical poetry.
Greg Newton (b. 4 December 1966)
Programmer at the University of Humanities Computing and Media Centre who worked on graphics and layout for the site in the fall of 2011.
Beth Norris
BA English (U of Victoria). Beth was a student in English 364 (English Renaissance Drama) in Spring 2006.
Helen M. Ostovich
Helen Ostovich is professor of English at McMaster University and editor of the journal Early Theatre. Her published work, aside from articles on Jonson and Shakespeare, includes editions of Jonson and Shakespeare, most recently Jonson’s The Magnetic Lady (Cambridge Works of Ben Jonson) and All’s Well that Ends Well (Internet Shakespeare Editions) with Karen Bamford and Andrew Griffin. She is also editing Richard Brome and Thomas Heywood’s The Late Lancashire Witches (Richard Brome Electronic Edition). She is a general editor for The Revels Plays (Manchester UP) andfor The Plays of the Queen’s Men (Internet Shakespeare Editions). She collaborated with Elizabeth Sauer (as co-editor) and about 80contributors to produce Reading Early Modern Women(Routledge, 2005).
Johanne Paquette
English 520, Representations of London, Fall 2005; MA student, English, University of Victoria. Johanne is currently a PhD candidate in the department of English.
Serina Patterson
At the time of her contribution to MoEML, Serina Pattersonwas an MA student in English at the University of Victoria. She is now a PhD student at the University of British Columbia with research interests in late medieval literature, game studies, and digital humanities. She is also the recipient of the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada CGS Joseph-Bombardier Scholarship and a four-year fellowship at UBC for her work in Middle English and Middle French game poems. She has published articles in New Knowledge Environments and LIBER Quarterly—The Journal of European Research Libraries on implementing an online library system for digital-age youth. She also has a forthcoming article in Studies in Philology and a chapter on casual games and medievalism in a contributed volume published by Routledge. She is currently editing a forthcoming contributed volume titled Games and Gaming in Medieval Literature for the Palgrave series, The New Middle Ages. In addition to her academic work, Serina is a web developer for the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria and owner of her own web design studio, Sprightly Innovations.
Nathan Phillips
Graduate Research Assistant, 2012-14. Nathan Phillips completed his MA at the University of Victoria specializing in medieval and early modern studies in April 2014. His research focuses on seventeenth-century non-dramatic literature, intellectual history, and the intersection of religion and politics. Additionally, Nathan is interested in textual studies, early-Tudor drama, and the editorial questions one can ask of all sixteenth- and seventeenth-century texts in the twisted mire of 400years of editorial practice. Nathan is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at Brown University.
Jillian Player
Jillian Player was born in south India and raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She has resided in Victoria, British Columbia since 1987. She has been creating art all her life and completed her formal art education in 2010 with a Post-Diploma in Fine Arts, with a focus in painting and video installation, from the Vancouver Island School of Art. She works with MoEML as a consultant artist, drawing in missing sections of the Agas map. Her portfolio can be found here.
Daniel Powell
Daniel Powell, MA, English, University of Victoria; Graduate Research Assistant in 2010. His research focuses on linguistic anxiety on the mid-sixteenth-century play Ralph Roister Doister by Nicholas Udall. He is preparing an online critical edition of the play for digital publication. He returned to the U of Victoria in September 2011 to undertake doctoral studies and works with the ETCL on the DevonshireManuscript.
Eoin Price
Eoin Price is a doctoral student at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon. His PhD, on political privacy in English Renaissance commercial drama, is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). He researches in the fields of intellectual and theatre history in the English Renaissance and has taught Shakespeare and early modern literature courses at the University of Birmingham. He regularly reviews modern productions of Renaissance plays and books on theatre history for scholarly journals.
Harvey Quamen
Dr. Harvey Quamen is an Associate Professor of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta. He specializes in science studies, cyberculture, and Modern and Postmodern literature. One of his works-in-progress, Becoming Artificial: H.G. Wells and the Scientific Discourses of Modernism, examines the early science fiction writer H.G. Wells as a crucial figure in the transformation of our conceptions of artificiality from nineteenth-century evolutionary theory to twentieth-century cyberculture and artificial intelligence. He is also working on a textbook that teaches the web technologies PHP and MySQL to humanities students. Other current interests include representations of science in popular culture, Internet Culture and web scripting languages.
Kevin A. Quarmby
Kevin A. Quarmby is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner and a member of MoEML’s Editorial Board. He is Assistant Professor of English at Oxford College of Emory University. He is author of The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and His Contemporaries (Ashgate, 2012), shortlisted for the Globe Theatre Book Award 2014. He has published numerous articles on Shakespeare and performance in scholarly journals, with invited chapters in Women Making Shakespeare (Bloomsbury, 2013), Shakespeare Beyond English (Cambridge, 2013), and Macbeth: The State of Play (Bloomsbury, 2014). Quarmby’s interest in the political, social and cultural impact of the theatrical text is informed by thirty-five years as a professional actor. He is editor of Henry VI, Part 1 for Internet Shakespeare Editions, Davenant’s Cruel Brother for Digital Renaissance Editions and co-editor with Brett Hirsch of the anonymous Fair Em, also for DRE.
Liam Sarsfield
Encoder, 2010. At the time of his work with MoEML, Liamwas a fourth-year honours English student at the University of Victoria. He now works at MetaLab.
Kevin Scott
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA honours student, English Language and Literature, University of Windsor. Mr. Scott is now an elementary school teacher.
Jeremy Smith
Jeremy Smith is assistant librarian, graphics and digital collections team, London Metropolitan Archives. Consultant
Morag St. Clair
Undergraduate Research Scholar (URS) 2009–10, Department of English, University of Victoria. Ms. St. Clair was a third-year English Honours student at the time she held the scholarship.
Michael Stevens Graduate research assistant, 2012-13. Michael Stevens began his MA at Trinity College Dublin and then transferred to the University of Victoria, where he completed it in early 2013. His research focuses on transnational modernism and geospatial considerations of literature. He prepared a digital map of James Joyce’s Ulysses for his MA project. Michael is a talented photographer and is responsible for taking most of the MoEML team photographs appearing on this site.
Kerra St John
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, theatre, University of Victoria. Director of ceremonies and events, University of Victoria.
Pat Szpak
Map of Early Modern London web designer and world traveler, Patrick has worked on and off on web design for over ten years. He loves clean design and big font sizes. Patrick has an MA in history from the University of Victoria and has lived in Africa, Europe, and the South Pacific working as a volunteer or just trying to survive.
Joey Takeda
Research Assistant, 2014. Joey Takeda is a BA Honours candidate in the Department of English (with a minor in Women’s Studies) at the University of Victoria. His primary research interests include American and Canadian poetry, North American Asian literature, the digital humanities, and cultural studies.
Amy Tigner
Amy Tigner is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. She is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas, Arlington, and the Editor-in-Chief of Early Modern Studies Journal. She is the author of Literature and the Renaissance Garden from Elizabeth I to Charles II: England’s Paradise (Ashgate, 2012) and has published in ELR, Modern Drama, Milton Quarterly, Drama Criticism, Gastronomica and Early Theatre. Currently, she is working on two book projects: co-editing, with David Goldstein, Culinary Shakespeare, and co-authoring, with Allison Carruth, Literature and Food Studies.
Camille van der Marel
Though not an early modernist by training, Camille’s research engages extensively with theories of mapping and the relationship between place and space in representations of the metropole and the periphery, especially in postcolonial and transnational literatures. These research interests were further developed in the year she spent working on MoEML with Dr. Jenstad as a research assistant (2008-2009). She is now a doctoral candidate at the University of Alberta.
Zaqir Virani
Graduate Research Assistant, 2013-14. Zaqir Virani completed his MA at the University of Victoria in April 2014. He received his BA from Simon Fraser University in 2012, and has worked as a musician, producer, and author of short fiction. His research focuses on the linkage of sound and textual analysis software and the work of Samuel Beckett.
Dana Wiley
English 412, Representations of London, Fall 2002; BA honours student, English Language and literature, University of Windsor. Ms. Wiley completed an MA in library science at the University of Western Ontario.
Donna Woodford-Gormley
Donna Woodford-Gormley is a MoEML Pedagogical Partner. She is Professor of English at New Mexico Highlands University. She is the author of Understanding King Lear: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents. She has also published several articles on Shakespeare and Early Modern Literature in scholarly books and journals. Currently, she is writing a book on Cuban adaptations of Shakespeare. In Fall 2014, she is teaching ENGL 422/522, Shakespeare: From the Globe to the Global, and her students will produce an article on The Globe playhouse for MoEML.
Katherine Young
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English, University of Victoria.
Can Zheng
English 520, Representations of London, Summer 2011. MA student, English, University of Victoria.
Export to RefWorks
RIS file (for RefMan, EndNote etc.)

MLA citation:

“Contributors.” The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Web. 20 August 2014. <http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/contributors.htm>.

Chicago citation:

“Contributors.” n.d. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed August 20, 2014. http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/contributors.htm.

APA citation:

Contributors. (n.d.). In J. Jenstad (Ed.), The Map of Early Modern London. Retrieved August 20, 2014, from http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/contributors.htm

TEI citation:

<bibl> <title level="a">Contributors</title>. (<date>n.d.</date>). In <editor><persName><forename>J.</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></persName></editor> (Ed.), <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>. Retrieved <date when="2014-08-20">August 20, 2014</date>, from <ref target="http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/contributors.htm">http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/contributors.htm</ref> </bibl>