The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward

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Broad-

THe next is Broadstreet
Ward
, which be-
ginneth within Bi-
shopsgate
, from the
Water Conduit,
Westward, on both
sides of the street,
by Alhallows Church, to an Iron grate
on the channell, which runneth into the
water-course of Walbrooke, before yee
come to the Posterne called Mooregate:
and this is the farthest West part of
that Ward. Then have ye Broadstreet,
whereof the Ward taketh name, which
stretcheth out of the formerstreet, from
the East corner of Alhallowes Church-yard,
somewhat South, to the Parish
Church of Saint Peter the poore
, on
both sides; and then by the South gate
of the Augustine Friers, West, downe
Throkmorton street, by the Drapers hall,
into Lothbury, to another grate of Iron
over the channell there, whereby the
water runneth into the course of Wal-
brooke
, under the East end of S. Marga-
rets
Church
; certaine posts of timber
are there set up: and this is also the far-
thest West part of this Ward, in the
said street. Out of the which street,
runneth up Bartholomew Lane, South,
to the North side of the Exchange: then
more East out of the former street,
from over against the Friers Augustines
Church
South gate, runneth up ano-
ther part of Broadstreet, south, to a Pump
over against S. Bennets Church.
Then have ye one other street, called
Three Needle street, beginning at the
VVell with two buckets, by S. Martins
Oteswich
Church
wall. This street run-
neth downe on both sides to Finkes lane,
and halfe way up that Lane, to a gate
of a Merchants house on the West side,
but not so farre on the East. Then the
aforesaid street, from this Finkes lane,
runneth downe by the Royall Exchange,
to the Stockes, and to a place formerly
called the Scalding house, or Scalding
wicke
, but now, Scalding Alley, by the
west side whereof, under the Parish
Church of Saint Mildred
, runneth the
course of Walbrooke: and these bee the
bounds of this VVard. Especiall Mo-
numents therein are these:
First, the Parish. Church of Alhal-
lowes
in the wall
; so called of standing
close to the wall of the Citie, in which
have beene buried:
Thomas Durrem, Esquire, and Marga-
ret
his wife.
Robert Beale, Esquire, 1601.
Deo Opt. Max. Sacrum & Memoriae.
A faire Menumēt in the wall close by the Pulpit, on the west side thereof.
Nobilis viri Dominici ab Heila, ex antiqua
apud Flandros Equestri familia, ob sin-
gularem sidem in Principem & Patri-
am, in Historiis subinde celebrata oriun-
di, qui cum Orthodoxae Religionis ergo,
relicta Patria, cui cum laude diu inser-
vierat; in Angliam, ut tutum fidelium
refugium, se recepisset, ibidem XXIV.
Postremos senectutis annos in Diveni
verbi jugi studio, pauperum{que} subventi-
one potissimii transegisset, & diu ante, ut
quotidie moriturus, de domo sua dis-
posuisset. Dissolvi, & cum Christo esse
cupieus: tandem satur dierum placidè
in Deo Salvatore obdomivit, 28. Apri-
lis, An. Christi, M.D.CVIII
.
Aetatis, 82. Londini Anglorum.
Item Memoriae.
Nobilis Matronae, Gulielmae ab Heila,
Conjugis ipsius, natae Patre Joanne Do-
mino Haleme & Finae, prope Insulas
Flandorum, ex Salopia Equaestri spud
Artesios Familia.. Quae marito Patri-
am ob Religionem relinquenti, in utra-
que fortuna fida socia, & in educandis
piè liberis, curanda{que} re domestica Ma
-
R2
terfamilias


incomparabilis. Obiit in
Christo, die ult. Maii. An. M.D.CV.
Aetatis 70. Conjugii, LI.
Huic utri{que} Parenti optimè de se merito,
debiti Honoris & gratitudinis ergo, Pe-
trus
ab Heila, F. Serenissimi Electoris
Palatini Consiliarius,
H. M. Moest. P.
Charities in this Parish are few or
none, but ordinary benevolences from
the parishioners themselves: except
some slender moity, issuing from cer-
taine Almes-houses, builded by London
wall
, neere to Bishopsgate, by Mr. Kempe,
and in his life time, as I have beene in-
formed.
The bounds of the Parish are need-
lesse to be spoken of, because their cir-
cuit containeth no great extent of
ground. Mr. Andrew Geneway, the Par-
son, used me here very kindly.
On the otherside of the street, among
many proper houses, (possessed for the
most part by Curriers) is the Carpen-
ters Hall
, which Company was incor-
porated in the 17. yeere of Edward the
fourth
.
Then East from the Curriers Row, is
a long and high wall of stone, inclosing
the North side of a large garden, adjoy-
ning to as large an house, builded in the
reignes of King Henry the eighth, and
of Edward the sixth
, by Sir William Pow-
let
, Lord Treasurer of England. Thorow
this Garden, which (of old time) consi-
sted of divers parts, now united, was
sometimes a faire foot way,
Lane stop-
ped up.
leading by
the west end of the Augustine Friers
Church straight North, and opened
somewhat VVest from Alhallowes
Church
against London wall, towards
Mooregate, which foot-way had gates
at either end, locked up every night;
but now the same way (being taken in-
to those Gardens) the gates are closed
up with stone, whereby the people are
inforced to goe about by Saint Peters
Church
,
Sir William Powlet, L. Treasu-
rers house in Broad-street.
and the East end of the said
Friers Church, and all the said great
place and Garden of Sir Wiliam Powlet
to London wall, and so to Mooregate.
This great house adjoyning to the
Garden aforesaid, stretcheth to the
North corner of Broadstreet, and then
turneth up Broadstreet, all that side, to
and beyond the East end of the said Fri-
ers Church. It was builded by the said
Lord Treasurer, in place of Augustine
Friers house, cloyster, and gardens, &c.
The Friers Church hee pulled not
downe, but the west end thereof, inclo-
sed from the Steeple and Quire, was
in the yeere 1550. granted to the Dutch
Nation in London, to be their Preaching
place. The other part, namely, the
Steeple, Quire, and side Iles to the
Quire adjoyning, he reserved to house-
hold uses, as for stowage of corne, coale,
and other things; his sonne and heire,
Marquesse of Winchester,1 sold the Monu-
ments of Noblemen (there buried) in
great number, the paving stone, and
whatsoever, (which cost many thou-
sands) for one hundred pounds, and in
place thereof made faire stabling for
horses. He caused the lead to be taken
from the roofes, and laid tile in place;
which exchange proved not so profita-
ble as he looked for, but rather to his
disadvantage.
On the East side of this Broadstreet,
amongst other buildings, on the backe
part of Gresham house, which is in Bi-
shopsgate
street
, he placed eight proper
Almes-houses, builded of bricke and
timber, by Sir Thomas Gresham, Knight,
for eight Almes-men, which bee now
there placed rent-free, and receive each
of them by his gift, 6. l. 13. s. 4. d.
yeerely for ever.
Next unto Powlet house, is the Parish
Church of S. Peter the poore
; so called
for a difference from other of that
name; sometime (peradventure) a poore
parish, but at this present there be ma-
ny faire houses, possessed by rich Mer-
chants, and others.
Buried in this Church:
Richard Fitzwilliams, Merchant-tay-
lor, 1520.
Sir William Roch, Maior, 1540.
Robert Calthrope,2 Maior, 1588.
Dominus Joannes Hales,
On a faire ancient place, in the wall North the Quire.
à pueritia lite-
ris deditus, excellenti ingenio, docilita-
ti, memoriae, studio & industria singu-
lari, adjuncta Linguarum, disciplinarum
juris antiquitatis-rerum di-vinarum, at-
que humanarum, magna & multiplici
doctrina instructissimus, evasit innocen-
tia, integritate, gravitate, constantia,
fide, pietate, Religione, gravissimae etiam
aegrotationis, & rerum difficilium diu-
turna


perpessione, & in patientia orna-
tissimus fuit, vitae honestissime sanctissi-
meque actae, diem supremum quinto Cal.
Ianuar. 1572. clausit anima excorporis;
reliquiae hoc loco sitae sunt.
Expecto resurrectionem mortuorum, &
vitam aeternam.
Two other Plates there are beneath
in the same wall, the one of Iohn
Quarles
, Draper, and the other of Ed-
ward Catcher
, Pewterer.
Here under this stone,
A faire plated stone on the groūd in the Chancell.
are buried the bodies
of John Lucas, of S. Johns beside Col-
chester
, Esquire, Master of the Re-
quests to the most vertuous, Noble, and
worthy Prince, King Edward the sixth.
He departed this life the 26. day of Octe-
ber, An. Dom. 1556
. And his daugh-
ter Margaret, late wife to Thomas
Pennie
, Doctor of Physicke, here buried
the 13. day of November, 1587.
Here lyeth the body of the Worshipfull Mr.
William Cockaine the elder,
A comely Monumēt fixed in the wall, at the east end of the Chancell.
Citizen
and Skinner of London, who departed
this life the 18. day of November, 1599.
Also here lyeth the body of Elizabeth
Medcalfe
, his first wife; by whom hee
had 7. sonnes and 4. daughters. All
which daughters departed this life, be-
fore any of them accomplished the age of
10. yeeres. The 7. sonnes lived, and
the yongest of them (at his death) was
fully 28. yeeres of Age. which said E-
lizabeth
departed this life, the 5. day
of April, 1589
. Here also lyeth the bo-
dy of Katharine Wonton, his second
wife, who dyed the 19. of September,
1596
. by whom he had no issue.
In the East end of the North Ile,
A beauti-
full Monu-
ment in the North Ile.

there is a faire and comely Monument,
There raised and placed, in the remem-
brance of Sir William Garaway, Knight,
and his wife. This Monument standeth
highest of all, next to the doores en-
trance.
Thomas Lowe,
Too mean a remem-
brance (in my mind) for a man so deser-
ving.
Eques Auratus, D. Ma-
joris Civitatis London, Ann. Domini,
1604. Vir probus & prudens. Obiit
11. die Aprilis, An. 1623. Aetat. 78.
Cui 28. die Ian. 1615. Aetatis suae
67. accessit Anna lectissima foemina ex
eodem Thoma mater, 15. liberorum;
vixerum suavissima conjunctione, An.
48.
The Charities given yeerely to the
poore of this Parish, are these ensuing:
The Lady Payton, deceased, hath gi-
ven yeerely for ever, in bread and other-
wise, the summe of 40. s.
The Lady Ramsey, deceased, hath gi-
ven the summe of 4. l. yeerely for ever.
Mr. Iohn Quarles, Citizen and Dra-
per of London, deceased, hath given the
summe of 5. l. yeerely for ever.
Mr. William May, Merchant-taylor,
deceased, hath given yeerely for ever,
2. s.
Other gifts have beene there bestow-
ed, to the poores reliefe, as one of forty
shillings, and another of twenty shil-
lings yeerely: but being tyed to no cer-
tainty, I am the more willing to omit
them.
Then next have ye the Augustin fri-
ers Church and Churchyard
,
Friers Au-
gustines
Church
, part wher-
of is the Dutch Church.
the en-
tring thereunto, by a South gate, to the
West Porch, a large Church, having a
most fine spired steeple, small, high,
and streight, I have not seene the like:
founded by Humphry Bohun, Earle of He-
reford
and Essex, in the yeere 1253. Re-
ginald Cobham
gave his Messuage in
London, to the inlarging therof, in the
yeere 1344. Humphry Bohun, Earle of
Hereford and Essex, re-edified this
Church in the yeere 1354. whose body
was there buried in the Quire. The
small spired steeple of this Church was
overthrowne by tempest of wind, in the
yeere 1362. but was raised of new, as
still it might have stood, had not pri-
vate benefit (the onely devourer of An-
tiquity) pull’d it downe. Both that
goodly Steeple, and all that East part
of the Church, hath lately beene taken
downe, and houses (for one mans com-
modity) raised in the place, whereby
London hath lost so goodly an ornament,
& times hereafter may more talke of it.
This house was valued at 57. pound,
and was surrendred the 12. of Novemb.
the 13. of Henry the 8
.
There lie buried in this Friers Church,
amongst others, Edmond, first sonne to
Ioane, Mother to King Richard the se-
cond
.
R3

Guy de Mericke, Earle of S. Paul.
What per-
sons of note and name, were bu-
ried in the Augustine Friers Church, are briefly here re-
membered
Lucie, Countesse of Kent, and one the Heirs of Barnaby, Lord of Millaine with an Epitaph.
Sir Humfrey Bohun, Earle of Hereford and Essex, Lord of Brecknocke.
Richard the great Earle of Arundell, Surrey and Warren, beheaded, 1397.
Sir Francis Atcourt, Earle of Pembroke, which married Alice, Sister to the Earle of Oxeford.
The Lord Iohn Vere, Earle of Oxford, beheaded on the Tower-hill, 1463.
Aubery de Vere, son and heire to the Earle of Oxford.
William Bourser, Lord Fitz Warren.
Dame Ioane Norris, the Lady of Bed-
ford
.
Anne, Daughter to Iohn, Viscount Welles.
Walter Nevell, Esquire.
The Wife of Sir David Cradocke, Knight.
The Mother to the Lord Spencers Wife.
Robert Newenton, Esquire.
The Lords Barons, slaine at Barnet field, buried there, 1471. In the body of the Church.
Sir Thomas Courtney, son to the Earle of Devonshire, and by him his sister, wedded to Cheverstone.
The Daughter of the Lord Beaumont.
Two sonnes of Sir Thomas Morley, to wit, VVilliam and Ralph.
Iohn Halton, Gentleman.
Ioha Surill, Gentleman.
In the East Wing, Margaret Baren-
tine
, Gentlewoman.
Iohn Spicer, Esquire, and Lettis his wife.
Iohn le Percers, Esquire.
Roger Chibary, Esquire.
Peter Morens, Esquire.
Iames Cuthing, Esquire.
Iohn Chornet, Esquire.
William Kenely, Esquire.
Margery, wife to Thomas Band, and daughter to Iohn Huch.
The L. William, Marquesse of Barke-
ley
, and Earle of Nottingham, and Dame Ioane his wife.
In the West Wing, Sir Iohn Tirrell, and Dame Katharine his wife.
Sir Iohn Blanckwell and his wife.
Sir Iohn Dawbeny, sonne and heire to Sir Giles Dawbeny.
Thomas Charles, Esquire.
Sir Iohn Dawbeny, Knight, and his sonne Robert.
Sir Iames Bell, Knight.
Henry Deskie, Esquire.
Sir William Tirell, and Sir William his brother, Knights.
William Collingborne, Esquire, behea-
ded, 1484.
Sir Thomas Coke, Maior in the yeere 1462.
William Edward, Maior, 1471.
Sir Iames Tirell, Sir Iohn VVindany, Knights, beheaded, 1502.
Sir Iohn Dawtrie, Knight, 1519.

Edward, Duke of Buckingham, behea-
ded, 1521.
Gwiscard, Earle of Huntington.
On the South side, and at the West end of this Church, many faire houses
are builded, namely in Throkmorton
street
, one very large and spacious, buil-
ded in the place of old and small tene-
ments,
T. Cromwell his house.
by Thomas Cromwell, Master of
the Kings Jewell-house; after that, Ma-
ster of the Rolls, then Lord Cromwell,
Knight, Lord Privie Seale, Vicar gene-
rall, Earle of Essex, high Chamberlain
of England, &c. This house being fini-
shed, and having some reasonable plot
of ground left for a Garden, hee caused
the pales of the Gardens adjoyning to
the North part thereof, on a sudden to
be taken downe, 22. foot to be measu-
red forth-right into the North of every
mans ground, a line there to be drawn,
a trench to be cast, a foundation laid,
and an high bricke wall to be builded.
My Father had a Garden there, & there
was a house standing close to his South
pale: this house they loosed from the
ground, and bare upon Rowlers into my
Fathers Garden 22. foot, ere my Father
heard thereof: no warning was given
him, nor other answer, (when he spake
to the surveyers of that worke) but that
their Master, Sir Thomas, commanded
them so to doe: no man durst goe to
argue the matter, but each man lost his
Land; and my Father paid his whole
rent, which was 6. shillings 8. pence
the yeere, for that halfe which was left.
Thus much of mine owne knowledge
have I thought good to note, that the
sudden rising of some men, causeth
them to forget themselves.
The Company of Drapers in London
bought this house, and now the same is
their common Hall. This Company
obtained of King Henry the 6. in the
seventeenth of his reigne
, to bee in-
corporate; Iohn Gedney was chosen to
be their first Master; and the 4. War-
dens were, 1. VVotton, I. Darby, Robert
Breton
,
The Dra-
pers
Armes.
and T. Cooke. The Armes gran-
ted to the said Company, by Sir VVil-
liam Bridges
, Knight, first Garter King
at Armes, in Blason are thus: Three Sun
Beames, issuing out of three clouds of
flame, crowned with three Crownes
Imperials of gold, upon a shield Azure.
From this Hall, on the same side,
downe to the grates and course of VVal-
brooke
, have ye divers faire houses for
Merchants and other, from the which
grates backe againe on the other side in
Lotisbury (so called in Record of Edward
the third
, the 38. yeere
, and now cor-
ruptly called Lothbury) are Candlestick-founders
placed, till ye come to Bartho-
lomew
Lane
, so called of Saint Bartholo-
mews
Church
, at the South East corner
thereof. In this Lane also are divers
faire builded houses on both sides, and
so likewise have ye in the other street,
which stretcheth from the Friers Augu-
stines
South gate, to the corner over a-
gainst Saint Bennets Church. In this
street, amongst other faire buildings,
the most ancient was (of old time) an
house pertaining to the Abbot of Saint
Albans
. Iohn Catcher, Alderman (after
dwelled there. Then is the free schoole,
pertaining to the late dissolved Hospi-
tall of Saint Anthony
, whereof more
shall be shewed in another place, and so
upto Three Needle street.
On the South part of which street,
beginning at the East, by the Well
with two buckets, now turned to a
Pumpe, is the Parish Church of S. Mar-
tin
called Oteswitch
, of Martin de Otes-
twich
, Nicholas de Oteswich, William Otes-
wich
,
and Iohn Oteswich, founders there-
of, and all buried there, as appeareth by
their ancient Monument.
There be Monuments in this Church,
of VVilliam Constantine, Alderman, and
Emme his wife.
Iohn Oteswich and his wife, under a
faire Monument on the South side.
Iohn Churchman, one of the Sheriffes
in the yeere 1385.
Richard Naylor, Taylor, Alderman,
1483.
Thomas Hay and Ellen his wife.
Oliver and VVilliam, sonnes to Iohn
VVoodroofe
, Esquire.
Hugh Pemberton, Taylor, Alderman,
1500. and Katharine his wife.
Matthew Pemberton, Merchant-Tay-
lor,


about 1514. he gave 50. l. to the
repairing of S. Lawrence Chappell.
Illustri ac Nobilissimo V. Domino Jacobo
Falckio
,
A faire engraven stone on the South side of the Commu-
niō Table.
Domino Zelandiae Thesaura-
rio, summo Consiliario ordinum ejusdem
Provinciae, post plurimas apud plerosque
Europae Reges, ac Principes obitas Ho-
norificè Legationes, & regendarum re-
rum infinitas, cum omnium laude, ac
admiratione curas, in extremis Ecclesiae
ac Patriae cum hostibus luctis defuncto,
Legati munere communi Patriae totius
Provinciarum Belgicarum foederatarii
apud Serenissimum & potentissimū Ja-
cobū
1. Angliae, Scotiae, Franciae & Hy-
berniae Regem: Hoc intestinorum recep-
taculum. Reliquum à funere totius mo-
lem, in Patria Zelandia pietati inter
planctus posuit affinis ex Sorore Antho-
nius Taymon
. Obiit 4. Nonas Iunii.
1603
.
Parte solo recubo
peregrino, parte paterno,
Hoc bene si didici
vivere, & hocce mori.
I. Murdisonius.
Quae natat Oceano
Zelandia corpus, Olympus
Ipse animam, peregrè
hoc viscera marmor habet.
A. Hunterus.
Viscera terra Britanna
tegit, Zelandia corpus,
Sic mea divisit
funera parce mihi.
I. Meursius.
Here lyeth the body of Clemens Langley,
A faire stone, on the other side of the Table.

late wife of Richard Langley, and
Daughter to Thomas Whitton, Gent.
And of Joane his first wife, daughter of
Robert Cresset, Esquire: who yeelded
her soule to her Redeemer, the last of A-
pril, 1603
.
Thyzealous care to serve thy God,
thy constant love to Husband deare:
Thy harmelesse heart to every one
remaines alive, though corps lye here.
Spes vermis & ego. R. L.
Vivit post funera Virtus. C. L.
Also the 19. day of March, 1612. Richard
Langley
her husband was here buried.
Here resteth the body of the Worshipful M.
Rich. Staper,
A very goodly Tombe e-
rected in the wal on the South side of the Church.
elected Alderman of this
Citie, 1594. He was the greatest Mer-
chant in his time, the chiefest Actor in
discovery of the Trades of Turkey and
East India: A man humble in prosperity,
painefull and ever ready in the affaires
publike, and discreetly carefull of his pri-
vate. A liberall house-keeper, bounti-
full to the poore: an upright dealer in
the world, and a devout aspirer after the
World to come. Much blest in his poste-
rity, and happy in his and their alliances.
He dyed the last day of Iune, An. Dom.
1608
. Intravit ut exiret.
Sir Henry Rowe allowed 5. l. yeerely
for ever to the poore of this Parish, to
be bestowed in bread and coales. And
Mistris Sotherton yeerely for ever in
bread, 50. s.
The aforesaid Iohn Churchman, for
William and Iohn Oteswich, (by licence
of H. the fourth, the sixth of his reigne)
gave the Advouson or Patronage of this
Church, foure messuages and 17. shops
with the appurtenances, in the Parish
of S. Martins Oteswich
, &c. to the Ma-
ster and Wardens of Taylors and Lin-
nen Armorers
, keepers of the Guild and
Fraternity of S. Iohn Baptist
in London,
and to their successors, in perpetuall
Almes, to be imployed upon the poore
Brethren and Sisters. Whereupon, ad-
joyning upon the West end of this Pa-
rish Church, the said Master and War-
dens builded (about a proper quadrant
or squared Court) seven Almes-houses,
Tailors & Linnen Armorers their alms houses in Broadstreets Ward: looke more in Portsoken ward.

wherein they placed seven Almes-men
of that Company, and their wives, (if
they had wives) each of these seven, of
old time, had 14. pence the weeke; but
now of later time, their stipend by the
said Master and Wardens hath beene
augmented to the summe of 26. shil-
lings the quarter, which is 5. l. 4. s.
the yeere to each of them, beside coales.
More, to each of them 20. s. the yeere,
by gift of Walter Fish, sometime Master
of that Company, and Taylor to Her
Majestie.
Some small distance from thence is
the Merchant-Taylors Hall, pertaining
to the Guild and Fraternity of Saint
Iohn Baptist
, time out of mind called of
Taylors and Linnen Armorers of Lon-
.
Antiquity of the Tai-
lors feast by autho-
rity.
For I finde that King Edward the
first
, in the 28. of his reigne
, confirmed
this Guild by the name of Taylors and
Linnen Armorers
, and also gave to the
brethren thereof, authority every yeere
at Midsummer to hold a Feast, and to
choose unto them a Governour or Ma-
ster, with Wardens: whereupon, the
same yeere, 1300. on the Feast day of
the Nativity of Saint Iohn Baptist,3 they
chose Henry de Ryall to be their Pilgrim.
For the Master of this Mystery (as one
that travelled for the whole Company)
was then so called, untill the 11. yeere of
Richard the second
: and the foure War-
dens were then called Purveyors of
Almes, (now called Quartredge) of the
said fraternity.
This Merchant-Taylors Hall, some-
time pertaining to a Worshipful Gen-
tleman, named Edmond Crepin, Dominus
Creeping
, after some Record: he, in the
yeere of Christ, 1331. the sixth of Ed-
ward
the third
, for a certaine summe of
money to him paid,
Taylors purchase their Hall.
made his grant
thereof, by the name of his principall
Messuage, in the Wards of Cornhill and
Broadstreet, which Sir Oliver Ingham,
Knight, did then hold; to Iohn of Yakley,
the Kings Pavilion-maker. This was cal-
led the New Hall, or Taylors Inne, for a
difference from their old Hall, which
was about the backe side of the Red Li-
on
in Basing lane, and in the Ward of
Cord-wayner street
.
The 21. of Edward the fourth, Tho-
mas Holme
, alias Clarentiaulx, King of
Armes for the South part of England,
granted by his Patents, to the said fra-
ternity and Guild of Saint Iohn Baptist,
of Tailors and Linnen Armorers
, to
beare in a Field Silver, a Pavilion be-
tweene two Mantles Imperiall, purple,
garnished with gold, in a chiefe Azure,
a holy Lambe, set within a Sunne, the
Creast upon the Helme, a Pavilion pur-
ple, garnished with gold, &c.
After this, King Henry the 7. was
himselfe a Brother of this Fraternity, or
Guild of S. Iohn Baptist, of Tailors or
Linnen Armorers
, (as divers others of
his predecessours Kings had beene) to
wit, Richard the 3. Edward the 4. Henry
the 6
. Henry the 5. Henry the 4. and Ri-
chard
the 2
. And for that divers of that
Fraternity had (time out of minde) bin
great Merchants, and had frequented
all sorts of merchandises into most parts
of the world, to the honour of the Kings
Realme, and to the great profit of his
subjects, and of his Progenitors, and the
men of the said mystery, (during the
time aforesaid) had exercised the buy-
ing and selling of all wares and Mer-
chandises; especially, of woollen cloth,
as well in grosse, as by retaile, through-
out all this Realme of England, and
chiefly within the said Citie: therefore
he of his especiall grace, did change,
transferre and translate the Guild afore-
said, and did incorporate them into the
name of the Master and Wardens of the
Merchant-Taylors, of the fraternity of
S. Iohn Baptist
, in the Citie of London.
Some distance West from this the
Merchant Taylors Hall, is Finkes-Lan;
so called of Robert Finke, and Robert
Finke
his sonne, Iames Finke, and Rosa-
mond Finke
. Robert Finke
the elder, new
builded the Parish Church of S. Bennet
commonly called Finke, of the Founder;
his Tenements were both of S. Bennets
Parish
, and Saint Martins Oteswich pa-
rish
: the one halfe of this Fink lane is of
Broadstreet Ward; to wit, on the West
side, up to the great and principall
house, wherein the said Finke dwelled:
But on the other side, namely the East,
not so much towards Cornehill. Then
without this Lane, in the aforesaid
Three Needle street, is the said Parish
Church of S. Bennet
, a proper Church,
in which are these Monuments:
Robert Simson, and Elizabeth his wife.
Roger Strange, Esquire, Treresse.
Thomas Briar, Plummer, 1410. &c.
By this Pillar was buried the body of Dame
Anne Awnsham
, who dyed the 23. of
December, 1613
. being neere 12. yeeres
the wife of Sir Gedeon Awnsham, of
Istleworth in the County of Middle-
sex
, Knight: And before the wife to
William Barradaile, Citizen and
Merchant-Taylor of London, dwelling
in this parish together some 30. yeeres.
He dyed in March, 1600. who by his
will gave 5. pounds to the poore of this
parish, and 6. pounds, 13. shillings, 8.
pence, toward the building a loft in the
Church, besides his other Legacies to the
poore


poore in other places. And the said Dame
Anne
, besides her other good deeds to
Istleworth, and other places, she also ap-
pointed five pound to the poore of this
Parish, which the said Sir Gedeon paid.
As they both (thankes be to God) lived
godly and well: so they could not but dye
well, by the onely mercy of Iesus Christ.
Some distance West is the Roy-
all Exchange
, whereof more shall bee
spoken in the Ward of Cornehill, and
so downe to the little Conduit, called
the Pissing Conduit, by the Stocks Mar-
ket
, and this is the South side of Three
Needle
street
.
On the North side of this streete,
from overagainst the East corner of St.
Martins Oteswich Church
,
Hospitall of Saint Anthony sometime a Syna-
gogue of the Iewes.
have yee di-
vers faire and large houses, til you come
to the Hospitall of St. Anthony, some-
time a Cell of Saint Anthonies of Vienna.
For I read, that King Henry the third,
granted to the Brotherhood of Saint
Anthony of Vienna, a place amongst the
Iewes, which was sometime their Syna-
gogue, and had been builded by them,
about the yeere 1231.
Patent re-
cord.
But the Christi-
ans obtained of the King, that it should
be dedicated to our blessed Lady, and
since, an Hospitall being there builded,
was called Saint Anthonies in London.
It was founded in the Parish of Saint
Bennet Finke
, for a Master, two Priests,
one Schoole-master, and twelve poore
men: after which foundation, amongst
other things, was given to this Hospitall
one Message and Garden, whereon
was builded the faire large free-school,
Free Schoole of S Antho-
nies
buil-
ded.

and one other parcell of ground contai-
ning 37. foot in length, and 18. foot in
bredth, whereon were builded the
Almes-houses of hard stone and Tim-
ber,
Almes-houses of S. Anthonie builded.
in the reigne of Henry the sixth,
which said Henry the sixth, in the 20.
of his reigne
, gave unto Iohn Carpenter,
Doctor of Divinity, and Master of S.
Anthonies Hospitall
, and to his bre-
thren and their successors for ever, his
Mannor of Poinington, with the appur-
tenances, with certaine pensions and
portions of Milburn, Burneworth, Charl-
ton
, and Vp-wimburne, in the County of
Southampton, towards the maintenance
of five Scholars in the Vniversity of
Oxford, to bee brought up in the facul-
ty of Arts, after the rate of tenne pence
the week for every Scholar: so that the
said Scholars bee first instructed in the
rudiments of Grammar, at the College
of Eaton, founded by the said King.
In the yeere 1474. Edward the fourth
granted to William Say, Batcheler of Di-
vinity, Master of the said Hospitall, to
have Priests, Clerkes, Scholars, poore
men, and brethren of the same, Clerks,
or Lay men, Queristers, Proctors, Mes-
sengers, Servants in houshold, and o-
ther things whatsoever, like as the Pri-
or, and Covent of Saint Anthonies of
Vienna, &c. Hee also annexed, united,
and appropriated the said Hospitall,
unto the Collegiate of Saint George in
VVindsor.
The Protectors of this house were to
collect the benevolence of charitable
persons, towards the building and sup-
porting thereof. And amongst other
things observed in my youth, I remem-
ber, that the Officers (charged with o-
versight of the Markets in this City)
did divers time take from the Market
people, Pigs starved, or otherwise un-
wholsome for mans sustenance: these
they did slit in the eare.
Saint Anthonies Pigs fed on the dunghils.
One of the
Proctors for St. Anthonies tyed a Bell
about the necke, and let it feed on the
Dunghils, no man would hurt, or take
it up: but if any gave to them bread, or
other feeding, such would they know,
watch for, and daily follow, whining
till they had somewhat given them:
whereupon was raised a Proverbe, Such
an one wil follow such an one, & whine as it
were an
Anthonie Pig: but if such a Pig
grew to be fat, and came to good liking
(as oft times they did) then the Proctor
would take him up to the use of the
Hospitall.
In the yeere, 1499. Sir Iohn Tate,
sometime Alebrewer, then a Mercer,
caused his Brewhouse, called the Swan
neere adjoyning to the said Free Chap-
pell, College, or Hospitall of Saint
Anthony
, to bee taken for the enlarging
of the Church, which was then newly
builded; toward the building whereof,
the said Tate gave great summes of mo-
ney, and finished it in the yeere 1501.
Sir Iohn Tate deceased 1514. and was
their buried, under a faire Monument
by him prepared. Doctor Tayler Master
of the Rolles and other.

Walter Champion, Draper, one of the
Sheriffes of London, 1529. was buried
there, and gave to the Beadmen twenty
pounds. The Lands by yeere of this
Hospitall, were valued in the 37. yeere
of Henry the 8
. to be 55. pounds, 6. shil-
lings, 8. pence.
One Iohnson,
Schoole-
master of S. Antho-
nies
made Prebend of Windsor, spoiled the school and ho-
spitall.
(a Schoolemaster of the
famous Free-schoole there) became a
Prebend of Windsore, and then (by little
and little) followed the spoile of this
Hospitall: he first dissolved the Quire,
conveyed away the Plate and Orna-
ments, then the Bels, and lastly put out
the Almes-men from their houses, ap-
pointing them portions of 12. pence
the weeke to each. But now I heare of
no such matter performed; for their
houses, with other, bee letten out for
rent, and the Church is a Preaching-place
for the French Nation.
This Schoole was commended in the
reigne of Henry the sixth, and sithence
commended above other; but now de-
cayed, and come to nothing, by taking
that from it which thereunto belonged.
Next it the Parish Church of Saint
Bartholomew
, at the end of Bartholomew
lane
. Thomas Pike, Alderman, with the
assistance of Nicholas Yoo, one of the She-
riffes of London, about the yeere 1438.
new builded this Church.
Sir Iohn Fray, Knight, was buried
there.
Margery his daughter and heire, wife
to Sir Iohn Lepington, Knight, founded
there a Chauntry, the 21. of Edward
the fourth
.
Alderban, a Gascoigne, was buried
there.
Sir W. Capell, Maior, 1509. aded un-
to this Church a proper Chappell, on
the South side thereof, and was buried
there.
Giles Capell was also buried there.
Iames Wilford, Taylor, one of the She-
riffes, 1499. appointed by his Testa-
ment, a Doctor of Divinity, every
Good Friday for ever, to preach there
a Sermon of Christs passion, from sixe
of the clocke till eight before noone, in
the said Church.
Io. Wilford, Merchant-Taylor, Al-
derman, 1544.
Sir George Barne, Maior, 1552.
Miles Coverdale, Bishop of Excester.
Thomas Dancer, and Anne his wife.
In Obitum Reverendissimi Patris,
A faire plated stone on the groūd in the Chancell.
Mi-
lanis Coverdal
, OGDOASTICON.
HIc tandem requiemque
ferens finem{que} laborum,
Ossa Coverdali
mortua Tumbus habet.
Oxoniae qui Praesul
erat dignissimus olim,
Insignis vitae
vir probitate suae.
Octoginta annos
grandevus vixit, & nullum
Indigni passus
saepius exilium.
Sic dimitti variis
jactabam casibus, ista
Excepitur gremio
terra benigna sua.
Here lyeth buried the body of Richard
Bowdler
,
Severall faire pla-
ted stones in the Chancell.
Citizen and Draper of Lon-
don
, being one of the Society of Mer-
chants Adventurers
in England, for
Moscovia and the East-Indiaes. Here
lyeth also Anne his wife, by whom hee
had issue, 7. children, 5. sonnes, and 2.
daughters; whereof three deceased, but
the other foure were living at the time
of his death. He dyed the 16. day of
November, 1603
. And shee, &c.
Here lyeth the body of Iohn Dent, whilest
he lived, Citizen and Merchant of Lon-
don
, borne at Halloughton in Lei-
cester-shire
, and free of the Salters
Company
, as also of the Spanish and
Moscovia Companies: but his chiefe
trading was to France. Hee was once
chosen Sheriffe of London,4 and once Al-
derman, and fined for the same. His last
fine was 1000. Markes, towards the
repairing of Christs Hospitall in Lon-
don
. He married twise; his first wife
was Margaret, by whom hee had one
sonne, who dyed, and the mother. The
second wife was Alice, by whom he had
3. Daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, and
Elizab. The first dyed in her Fathers
life time, the rest with the Mother re-
mained living. Hee beeing aged 63.
yeeres, dyed the 10. of Decemb. 1595.
Here

Here lyeth the body of Master Thomas
Church
, Citizen and Draper of Lon-
don
. He was helpfull to many, hurtfull
to none, and gave every one his due. In
memory of whose love to them, and theirs
to him, Mary Bagwell, his sister, Wil-
liam Bagwell
, her sonne, his Execu-
tors, and Bernard Cooper, the second
Husband to the said Mary Bagwell,
caused this stone to be laid here, the 28.
day of May, 1617
. Hee departed this
life in August the 26. day, 1616. being
aged 55. yeeres.
A good life hath the dayes num-
bred, but a good name endureth
for ever.
To Gods Glory.
In pious Memory of the nobly-
vertuous,
A faire Monumēt in the North wal or the Chancell.
and religions Matrone, Mar-
garite
, wife of Robert Hall, Doctor
of Divinity, and Pastor of
this Parish.
HEre lyes a Margarite
that the most excell’d,
(Her Father Wyts,
Her Mother Lichterveld,
Rematcht with Metkerke)
of remarke for birth,
But much more gentle
for her genuine worth:
Wyts (rarest) Iewell,
so her name bespeakes)
In pious, prudent,
peacefull, praise-full life,
Fitting a Sara
and a Sacred’s Wife,
Such as Saravia,
and (her second) Hill,
Whose joy of life,
Death in her death did kill.
Quàm piè obiit, Puer-
pera, Die 29. Iunii, Anno Salutis, 1615. Anno Aetatis, 39. Pignus Amoris, Sigum Honoris, ac Moeroris, Posuit Rob. Hill. Composuit Io. Syl.
Vxor Foelix.
Loquitur post Funera Virtus.
FRom my sad Cradle
to my sable Chest,
Poore Pilgrim, I
did finde few moneths of rest.
In Flanders, Holland,
Zeland, England, all,
To Parents, troubles;
and to me did fall.
These made me pious,
patient, modest, wise:
And, though well borne,
to shun the Gallants guise:
But now I rest my soule,
where rest is found,
My body here,
in a small piece of ground,
And from my Hill,
that Hill I have ascended,
From whence (for me)
my Saviour once descended.
Live ye to learne that dye you must,
And after come to Judgement just.
Maritus moestissimus.
Thy rest gives me a restlesse life,
Because thou wert a matchlesse Wife;
But yet I rest in hope to see
That day of Christ, and then see thee.
MARGARITA, a Jewell.
I, like a Iewell
tost by Sea and Land,
Am bought by him,
who weares me on his hand.
MARGARITA, MARGARETA.
Margarita beat, sed Margareta beavit.
O utinam possit dicier, ista beat.
One night, two dreames,
made two Propheticals,
Thine of thy Coffin,
mine of thy Fuuerals.
If women all were like to thee,
We men for wives should happy be.
MARGARITA surreptus est, Mons
exarvit.
Then lower downe, towards the
Stockes Market, is the Parish Church
of Saint Christopher
, but re-edified of
new: for Richard Shore, one of the She-
riffes, 1506. gave money towards the
building of the steeple.
There lye buried, Richard Sherington,
1392. who gave Lands to that Church.
The Lady Margaret Norford, 1406.
Iohn

Iohn Clavering, 1421. who gave lands
thereunto.
Iohn Godney,
An Al-
derman of London put to pe-
nance by the Clear-
gie, for wedding a widdow professed to chasti-
tie.
Draper, Maior, 1427.
This Godney, in the yeere 1444. wedded
the Widdow of Robert Large, late Mai-
or, which Widdow had taken the Man-
tle and Ring, and the vow to live chaste
to God terme of her life; for the breach
whereof, the marriage done, they were
troubled by the Church, and put to pe-
nance both he and she.
  • William Hampton, Maior, 1472. was
    a great benefactor, and glased some of
    the Church windowes.
  • Sir William Martia, Maior, 1492.
  • Roger Acheley, Maior, 1511. Hee
    dwelt in Cornhill Ward, in a house be-
    longing to Cobham Colledge, rented by
    the yeere, 26. s. 8. d.
  • Robert Thorne, Merchant-Taylor, a
    Batchelor, 1532. he gave by his Testa-
    ment in charity, more than 4445.
    pounds.
Henry Beecher, Alderman, 1570.
Robertus cubat hic
Thornus Mercator honestus,
A very faire Tombe of pure Touch, in the South side of the Quire.
Qui sibi legitimas
Arte paravit opes.
Huic vitam dederat
puero Bristollia quondam,
Londinum hoc Tumulo
clauserat ante diem.
Ornavit studiis,
patriam virtutibus auxit,
Gymnasium exexit,
sumptibus ipse suis.
Lector quisquis ades,
requiem cineri precor optes,
Supplex et precibus
numina flecte tuis.
Obiit 1532. aetatis vero suae, Au. 40.
Heere lye the bodies of Henry Beecher,
Alderman, and late Sheriffe of London;
and of Alice his first wife, one of the
daughters to Thomas Heron of Edge-
comb
, in the County of Surrey, Esquire,
by who he had 10. children. After whose
decease he married with Iane, the widdow
of one Oliver Loveband, of London,
Gent. with whom he lived three yeeres, and
dyed the 15. day of Ianuary, Anno Dom.
1570.
Here lyeth the body of Iohn Tryon, who
departed this life at Paris in France,
the 15. of August, and was here interred
the 14. day of September, An. Dom.
1612
.
Having seene and observed the said
Parish Church of S. Christopher,
Robert Thorne, a bounti-
full Bat-
chelour, buried in the same Parish of S. Christo-
pher
.
with
all the Grave-stones and Monuments
therein: and finding a faire Tombe of
Touch, wherein lyeth the body of Ro-
bert Thorne
, Merchant-Taylor, and a
Batchelor buried, having given by his
Testament in charity, 4445. pounds,
and to pious uses. Then looking for
some such memory, as might adorne
and beautifie the name of another fa-
mous Batchelor, Mr. Iohn Kendrick; and
finding none, but onely his Hatchments
and Banners, yet he being buried so long
since; I thought it fit to let his owne
last Will and Testament speake his due
and deserved praises, according, and as
(among other) it came to my hands.
The last Will and Testament
of Mr. Iohn Kendrick, Citizen
and Draper of London:
Who departed this life the 30. day
of December, Anno, 1624
.
IN the Name of God,
Present at this godly worke, Io. Skinner, Andrew Kendrick, Tho. Single-
ton
, &c.
Amen. The
nine and twentieth of December, An-
no Domini, 1624
. And in the two
and twentieth yeere of the reigne of our
Soveraigne Lord King Iames
, &c.
I Iohn Kendrick, of the Citie of Lon-
don
, Draper, being sicke in body; but
of good and perfect memory, (for which
I give most humble and hearty thankes
to Almighty God) doe make, ordaine
and declare this my last Will and Te-
stament, in manner and forme follow-
ing: That is to say:
First,
Dispositi-
on of his soule to God.
and before all things, I com-
mend and commit my soule to Almigh-
ty God, my Creator; trusting most as-
suredly to be saved by the death, passion
and onely merits of Iesus Christ, my Sa-
viour and Redeemer.
S
And


And I will that my body be decent-
ly interred in Christian buriall,
For burial of his bo-
dy.
in the
Parish Church of S. Christopher, where
I dwell; as mine Executor, hereafter
named, shall order and appoint.
Item, I give and bequeath to three-
score poore men,
For poore mourners.
to every of them a
Gowne of broad-cloth, to weare on the
day of my buriall: and twelve pence a
piece in money, to pay for their din-
ners. The same poore men to bee such
as my Executor shall appoint.
Item, I give and bequeath blacke
Gownes and Cloakes,
For kin-
dred, friends, & servants mourners.
to be worne at
my buriall by my kindred, friends, and
servants, as my Executor shall thinke
meet: not exceeding the summe of sixe
hundred pounds in the said Gownes and
Cloakes, and the rest of the charges of
my Funerall.
Item, I give and bequeath the sum
of threescore pounds,
A Dinner for his friends, and the Parish inhabitants.
to bee bestowed
upon a Dinner, to be provided for my
friends, and the inhabitants of the Pa-
rish of Saint Christopher
, where I now
dwell, upon the day of my buriall, and
in such place as my Executor shall
thinke meet and convenient.
Item,
His gift to the Maior & Burges-
ses of Rea-
ding
.
I give and bequeath to the
Maior and Burgesses of the Towne of
Reading, in the Country of Berkshire, (I
meane, to the body corporate, or Cor-
poration of the said Towne of Reading,
by whatsoever name or addition the
same is made knowne) the summe of
seven thousand & five hundred pounds,
upon especiall trust and confidence, that
they shall therewith performe the uses
following: That is to say:
The said Maior and Burgesses shall
buy and purchase unto them and their
successors for ever,
The uses intended for the said sum.
(I say, to the body
corporate of the said Towne of Reading,
by whatsoever name or addition the
same is made or knowne) Lands and
Here ditaments, of the cleere value of
fifty pounds by the yeere, over and a-
bove all charges and reprises. Which
summe of fifty pounds a yeere, my will
and meaning is, shall bee paid by the
said Maior and Burgesses, and their suc-
cessours, unto my Sister Anne Newman,
Care of his Sister.

yeerely during her naturall life. And
after her decease, the same yeerely sum
of fifty pounds, shall bee paid by the
said Maior and Burgesses, and their suc-
cessors, to the Overseers of the poore of
the said Towne of Reading (for the time
being) yeerely for ever: And by them
the said Overseers (for the time being)
shall be bestowed and distributed to
and among the poore people of the said
Towne for ever: To wit, the moity
thereof every halfe yeere, in such sums,
and to such persons, as the said Over-
seers (for the time being) shall thinke
meet, according to the necessity and de-
sert of the same severall persons.
Provided alwayes,
The usuall benevo-
lence of the rich is not to bee hindred by this gift.
and my meaning
is, that this my yeerely gift shall not
any way abridge the said poore of the
ordinary allowances, usually assessed
and collected of the wealthier sort of
the inhabitants of the said Towne, to-
wards the reliefe of the said poore peo-
ple: but shal be unto them as an addita-
ment, and cleere increase of reliefe yeer-
ly for ever.
And if this my gift and provision shall
happen (which I trust it shall not) to be
by the said Maior and Burgesses,
For negli-
gence in the distri-
bution of this gift.
or by
the said Overseers for the time being,
ordered and disposed contrary to my
meaning thus declared; or that my will
and desire above expressed, touching
the bestowing and distribution of the
said summe of fifty pounds yeerely, bee
omitted, neglected, or left unperformed
by the space of one whole yeere, after it
is by this my Will appointed to be di-
stributed and bestowed as aforesaid:
Then my will and meaning is, that the
said summe and revenue of fifty pounds
a yeere, shall be by the said Maior and
Burgesses, and their successors for the
time being for ever, paid unto the
Treasurer of Christs Hospitall: and by
the Governours of the same Hospitall,
How to be bestow-
ed upon their neg-
ligence.

imployed and bestowed in the reliefe
and education of the poore children,
of the said Hospitall. Or else, that the
said Maior and Burgesses for the time
being; shall by their Deed in Law, con-
veigh and make over the Lands and He-
reditaments of the said yeerely value of
fifty pounds, unto the Maior and Com-
monalty and Citizens of the Citie of
London, and their successors for ever,
unto the use of the said Hospitall, to be
imployed as aforesaid.
Provided alwaies, that the said fifty
pounds a yeere, bee yeerely paid unto
my


my said Sister Anna Newman,
Payment to his Si-
ster du-
ring her naturall life.
during
her naturall life: And after her decease,
to the charitable uses aforesaid.
Moreover, my will and meaning is,
as also my trust and confidence in the
said Maior and Burgesses of the Towne
of Reading is,
A house to be purcha-
sed for set-
ting the poore to worke.
that with another compe-
tent part of the said summe of seven
thousand five hundred pounds, so byme
devised as aforesaid; they the said
Maior and Burgesses shall buy and pur-
chase unto them and their successors
for ever, a faire plot of ground, within
the said Towne of Reading, or the liber-
ties thereof. And thereupon shall erect
and build a strong house of Bricke, fit
and commodious for setting the poore
on worke therein: Or else shall buy and
purchase such an house, being already
built, if they can finde one already fit-
ting, or that may with a reasonable sum
be made fit for the said use.
The house is to have a Garden thereto adjoy-
ning.
The same
house to have a faire Garden adjoyning,
and to bee from time to time kept in
good and sufficient reparations, by the
said Maior and Burgesses for the time
being, for ever. Which house and Gar-
den, my will is, shall be used and occu-
pied by such as the said Maior and Bur-
gesses, and their successors from time to
time for ever shall appoint and or-
daine,
Imploy-
ing and u-
sing the stocke of money.
for the imploying and handling
of the stocke of money, by mee hereby
left and devised to that purpose.
And my will and meaning is, that
the said Lands and Hereditaments of
the yeerely value of fifty pounds, and
also the said house and Garden, being
bought and purchased as aforesaid, with
parcell of the said summe of seven thou-
sand five hundred pounds: Then the
whole residue and remainder of the
same seven thousand and five hundred
pounds,
How the remain-
der of the money is is to bee imployed for a com-
mon stock
shall make and be a common
stocke, to be imployed and bestowed in
Trades of clothing; either in making
of coloured clothes, or whites, as the
time shall require. And also in working
of Wooll, Hemp, Flax, Iron, grinding
of Brazill woods, and other stuffes for
dying, or otherwise, as to the said Maior
and Burgesses aforesaid, and their suc-
cessors for ever shall seeme meet and
convenient, for the imployment of
poore people, and for the preservation
and increase of the said common stock.
And the said Maior and Burgesses,
For han-
dling and husban-
ding the common stocke in the house.

and their successors for ever, shall have
the election, placing and ordering, as
also the displacing (if cause bee) of all
and every person and persons, to bee
imployed in the handling and husban-
ding, of the common stock in the house
aforesaid: according to their the said
Maior and Burgesses good discretion,
from time to time for ever.
Wherein yet my desire is, that they
shall prefer the poore of the said Town
to the said worke and imployment; be-
fore others of other places.
And for the performance of these
premisses,
In what manner the 7500. pounds is to be paid.
my will is, that the somme
of seven thousand and five hundred
pounds, before (for this end) by mee
bequeathed to the said Maior and Bur-
gesses, or their successors: shall be paid
unto them or their successors, in man
and forme following; that is to say,
Two thousand pounds thereof at the
end of one yeere next after my decease:
Other two thousand pounds thereof, at
the end of two yeeres, next after the
day of my decease. And the residue of
the said whole sum, being three thou-
sand and five hundred pounds, at the
end of three yeeres next ensuing, after
and from the day of my decease.
But if it shall happen (as my trust is
it will not) that the said Maior and Bur-
gesses,
For misim-
ploying the stocke contrary to the Doners will.
or their successors, shall neglect,
omit or faile to performe the premisses,
according to my will and meaning a-
bove declared; or shall misimploy the
said stocke, contrary to the true intent
and meaning of this my device and dis-
position, for the good of the poore, and
their honest imployment and mainte-
nance as aforesaid; and that such their
neglect shall continue at any time, by
the space of one whole yeere together:
Then my will and meaning is, that my
said whole Legacy of seven thousand
and five hundred pounds, and every
part and parcell thereof, shall be thence
utterly void, frustrate and of none effect,
as to, for and concerning the said Maior
and Burgesses and their successors; and
as to, for and concerning the uses ther-
of before limited and expressed. And
that the said whole common stocke,
shall bee by them the said Maior and
Burgesses, and their successors for the
S2
time


time being;
His intent for London upon their fay-
ling.
forthwith paid unto the
Maior and Communalty and Citizens
of the City of London, to the use of
Christs Hospitall in London, according
as I have above devised and disposed,
touching the revenue of fifty pounds a
yeere for ever, first bequeathed to the
use and reliefe of the poore people of
the Towne of Reading.
As also my will and meaning is, that
in this case of non-performance by the
said Maior and Burgesses, the house and
Garden to bee purchased in Reading,
Concer-
ning the house and Garden at Reading devised.
as
aforesaid: Shal be by the said Maior and
Burgesses, and their successors, convey-
ed and made over by their deed suffici-
ent in Law, unto the said Maior and
Communalty and Citizens of the City
of London, and their successors for ever,
to the like use of Christs Hospitall in
London, as aforesaid.
Item, I give and bequeath to the
Maior, Aldermen and Burgesses of the
Towne of Newbury in the County of
Berks (I meane the body corporate of
the same Towne,
For pur-
chasing a house and Garden at Newbery to set the poore on worke.
) the summe of foure
thousand pounds, to buy and purchase
therewith a commodious house, and
Garden within the same Towne, or
the liberties thereof; to set the poore
on worke. And with the residue of the
same summe, to make a common stock,
for the imployment of the poore in the
said house; according to the good dis-
cretion of the said Maior, Aldermen
and Burgesses from time to time for e-
ver. And according to my meaning
before declared, in the devising of the
summe of seven thousand and five hun-
dred pounds, to the Maior and Burges-
ses of the Towne of Reading, to the like
use.
But my will and meaning is, that if
it shall happen (which I trust will not)
that the said Maior,
For neg-
lect and misim-
ployment of the stock com-
mitted un-
to their trust.
Aldermen and
Burgesses of the Towne of Newbury, or
their successors, shall neglect or faile to
performe my trust and meaning, hereby
committed unto them, or shall misim-
ploy the said stocke, contrary to my
good intent to the poore before decla-
red, by the space of one whole yeere (at
any time) after my said Legacy shall be
paid unto them: Then my will and
meaning is, that my said whole Legacy
of foure thousand pounds, and every
part and parcell thereof, shall thence-
forth be utterly void, and of none effect,
as to, for and concerning the said Maior
Aldermen and Burgesses of the Towne
of Newbury, and their successors for e-
ver. And that the said whole common
stock, be by them the said Maior, Al-
dermen and Burgesses of Newbury, and
their successors for the time being,
Returned over to Reading and im-
ployed to the use of the poore there.

forthwith paid over unto the Maior and
Burgesses of the Towne of Reading in
the same County. To be by them and
their successors for ever imployed, be-
stowed and used in like manner, as I
have by this my Will devised and ap-
pointed another stocke common for
the poore in the same Town of Reading:
as by my said devise and disposition
(before herein more at large expressed)
doth and may appeare.
In the like manner also my will and
meaning is, that in case of such non-per-
formance of my will and intent, by the
said Maior, Aldermen and Burgesses
of the Towne of Newbury,
For non performance of the Testa-
tors wil and in-
tent in the Towne of Newbury
the house
and Garden by them so to bee purcha-
sed and built, as aforesaid: Shall be by
said Maior, Aldermen and Burgesses of
the Towne of Newbury, and their suc-
cessors; conveyed and made over by
their deed sufficient in Law, unto the
Maior and Burgesses of the said Towne
of Reading, and their successors for ever;
to be by them sold and converted into
money, and the same money to be used
and imployed in their common stocke
for the poore in the said Towne of Rea-
ding
aforesaid, in such sort, as I have
formerly hereby expressed.
And for the performance of the said
trust and uses, by the said Maior, Al-
dermen and Burgesses of the Towne
of Newbury aforesaid,
In what manner the four thousand pounds is to be paid to the Towne of Newbury
my will and mea-
ning is: that the said summe of foure
thousand pounds so to them bequea-
thed and devised as aforesaid; shall be
paid unto them, or their successors, in
manner as followeth; that is to say,
One thousand pounds therof at the end
of one yeere, next ensuing after the day
of my decease: One other thousand
pounds thereof, at the end of two yeers
from and after my said decease. And
the residue (being two thousand l.)
shall be paid them, at the end of three
yeeres next after my decease.
Item,

Item, I give and bequeath to the
Company of Drapers of the City of
London (of which Company I am free)
the summe of two thousand and foure
hundred pounds,
Two thou-
sand foure hundred pounds given to the Com-
pany of Drapers
London.
to purchase Lands
and Hereditaments, to the cleare yeer-
ly value of one hundred pounds for e-
ver: over and above all charges and re-
prises. And with the same to performe
these good uses hereafter mentioned;
that is to say:
The summe of twenty foure pounds
thereof yeerely for ever,
For the yeerely re-
leasing of sixe poore Prisoners.
to be bestowed
in the moneth of December, for the re-
leasing of sixe poore prisoners, out of
these Prisons in London, to wit, the two
Compters, Ludgate, Newgate and the
Fleet, by foure pounds for each in Pri-
soner.
Or if such cannot bee found in the
said Prisons,
For relea-
sing Priso-
ners in o-
ther Pri-
sons, &c.
or some of them to be re-
leased for these sums: Then the same
(or the residue thereof) to be bestow-
ed in like releasing of other Prisoners,
out of some of the Prisons neere Lon-
don
, and out of the liberties thereof; as
to the Wardens of the said Compa-
ny (for the time being) shal seeme meet.
More, twenty pounds yeerely for e-
ver,
To the Curate of the Parish Church of S. Christo-
phers
.
to the Curate of the Parish of St.
Christopher
, wherein I now dwell: To
read divine Service in the said Parish
Church at sixe a clocke in the morning
every day of the weeke for ever. In like
manner as is now used in the Chappell,
at the great North-gate of Saint Pauls
Church
in London.
More,
To the Clerke and Sex-
ton of S. Christopher.
to the Clerke and Sexton of
the said Parish of Saint Christopher, to
each of them fifty shillings yeerely for
ever: to doe their severall attendance
and assistance at the time of Divine
Service every morning.
More,
To the poore of the Parish
to the Church-wardens of the
same Parish of Saint Christopher: five
pounds yeerely for ever, for the main-
tenance of lights in the Winter time.
More, three pounds yeerely for ever,
to the poore of the said Parish of Saint
Christopher
.
More,
To the Compters and New-
gate
.
to the poore Prisoners in Lon-
don
ten pounds yeerely for ever: name-
ly, to the Prisoners of the Compters in
the Poultry and Woodstreet, and in New-
gate
; to each of these Prisons forty shil-
lings yeerely for ever.
To the poore Prisoners in Ludgate
and in the Fleet;
To Ludgate and the Fleet.
to each house thirty
shillings for ever.
And to the poore Prisoners in Beth-
lem
,
To Bedlem.
or Bedlem; twenty shillings yeere-
ly.
More,
To the Clerke of the Dra-
pers
.
to the Clerke of the Compa-
ny of the Drapers
, for the time being:
for his paines herein, forty shillings for
ever.
More,
To the Beadles of the Livery and Yeo-
manry.
to the Beadle of the said Com-
pany; thirty shillings for ever.
More, to the Beadle of the Yeoman-
ry of the same Company; ten shillings
yeerely for ever.
More,
For poore Clothwor-
kers
and their wid-
dowes.
five and twenty pounds yeere-
ly for ever to be distributed by the said
Wardens, among poore and religious
men and women in the City of London;
to some more and to some lesse, as the
said Wardens shall find their necessity
and desert to be: Wherein my desire
is, that poore Clothworkers and their
Widdowes shall bee first preferred;
and next, the poore of the Drapers
Company
. The residue of the said sum
of one hundred pounds a yeere, being
foure pounds yeerely for ever,
A remem-
brance to the foure Wardens.
I entreat
the foure Wardens of the said Compa-
ny, to accept for their paines, to bee e-
qually divided between them by twen-
ty shillings to each of them, for the time
being for ever.
And if the said Company of Dra-
pers
, doe either of purpose or negli-
gence, omit and not performe the pre-
misses; but shall leave the same unper-
formed one whole yeere, after they
shall have received this my Legacy of
two thousand & foure hundred pounds
(which I will shall be paid them at the
end of one yeer next after my decease:)
Then my will and minde is,
If the Dra-
pers
omit perfor-
mance of this Lega-
cy of two thousand and foure hundred pounds.
that the
Governours of Christs Hospitall in
London, shall recover the whole two
thousand and foure hundred pounds,
before specified, or the Lands and the
Hereditaments, that the said Compa-
ny shall have bought with the same
money: And keepe twenty pounds
yeerely for ever of the same rent, for
the maintenance of the poore Children
in the said Hospitall, as if the same had
been first given to them. And the Dra-
pers Company
to have nothing to doe
with it, or the rest of the said hundred
S3
pounds


pounds yeerely for ever.
And that in this case,
A restraint of the o-
ther Le-
gacies gi-
ven and bequea-
thed to the Com-
pany.
the yeerely
payment of eight pounds unto the
Clerke, Beadles and Wardens of the
said Company, as also twelve pounds,
parcell of the said five and twenty l.
a yeere before devised, to be paid and
distributed by the said Company, a-
mong poore and religious men and
women in the City of London, utterly
and for ever to cease.
But this twenty pounds a yeere, be-
ing so converted (as aforesaid) to the
use of the Hospitall, the residue of the
said yeerly rent of one hundred pounds
a yeere, I will that the Governours of
the said Hospitall,
Concer-
ning the residue of the yeere-
ly rent.
shall pay and distri-
bute yeerely for ever, in manner and
forme as the said Company of Dra-
pers
should have done.
Item, I give and bequeath to the
said Company of Drapers, one hun-
dred pounds, to be paid within a yeere
after my decease;
An hun-
dred pounds to be bestow-
ed in Plate.
and by the Wardens
of the said Company to be bestowed in
Plate: such as they shall thinke good,
for the use of their common Hall in
London, at their meetings and dinners
there.
Item,
Five hun-
dred pounds given to Christs Hospitall in London.
I give and bequeath to the
poore of Christs Hospitall in London,
five hundred pounds, to be by the Go-
vernours thereof bestowed in Lands
and Hereditaments, for and towards
the yeerely maintenance of the Chil-
dren of the said Hospitall for ever. This
summe to bee paid to the said Gover-
nours, or the Treasurer of the said Ho-
spitall, so soone as they shall have found
out a fit purchase to bestow it, and a
greed on the price of the same.
Item, I give and bequeath towards
the curing of sicke,
Fifty pounds to S. Bartholo-
mews
Ho-
spitall
.
fore and diseased
persons in Saint Bartholomews Hospital
in London, the summe of fifty pounds.
Item, I give and bequeath towards
the curing of sicke,
To the poore of S. Thomas Hospitall.
sore and disea-sed
persons in Saint Thomas Hospitall in
Southwarke neere London, the summe of
fifty pounds.
Item, I give and bequeath towards
the repayring of the Parish Church of
Saint Christopher
, where I now dwell,
the summe of forty pounds: To be paid
to the Church-wardens of the same Pa-
rish, within one yeere after my decease.
Item,
Repairing S. Pauls Church in London.
I give and bequeath towards
the repayring of the Cathedral Church
of Saint Paul
in London, the summe of
one thousand pounds: to be paid to the
Chamberlaine of London, at such time
as that worke of repayring the same
Church, shall be ready to proceed with
effect; and to be disposed by the directi-
on and appointment of the Lord Maior
and Aldermen of the said City.
Item, I give and bequeath to bee
given at the marriages of poore Maids
within the City of London,
To poore Maids marriages in London.
two hun-
dred pounds: to be distributed by for-
ty shillings a peece upon the dayes of
their marriage; to such as have served
one Master or Mistresse, by the space of
five yeeres together.
Item,
To poore Maids marriages in the Towne of Reading.
I give and bequeath to be gi-
ven and distributed to poore Maids in
Towne of Reading, in the County of
Berks, and at their severall marriages,
by forty shillings a peece, at the discre-
tion of the Maior and Burgesses of that
Towne; the summe of one hundred
pounds. Provided, none enjoy the be-
nefit thereof, but such as have served
Master, Mistris or Dame, by the space
of seven yeeres together. This hundred
pounds to bee paid to the said Maior
and Burgesse (for the use aforesaid)
within one yeere next after my de-
cease.
Item, I give and bequeath to the Mai-
or,
To twen-
ty five poore Maids marriages in the Towne of Newbury.
Aldermen and Burgesses of the
Towne of Newbury in Barkeshire, the
summe of fifty pounds: to be by them
bestowed and distributed to twenty five
Maids marriages, on their severall daies
of their weddings in the same Towne.
None to enjoy this gift; but such as
have well and honestly served with one
Master, Mistris of Dame, by the space
of seven yeeres at the least. And this
fifty pounds to be paid to the said Maior
Aldermen and Burgesses, within one
yeere next after my decease.
Item,
For set-
ting poore vagrant Boyes on worke in Bridewell.
I give and bequeath towards
the setting on worke of forty idle va-
grant Boyes, such as goe up and downe
the streets in the City of London, beg-
ging and pilfering, the summe of two
hundred pounds: to be paid to the Trea-
surer for the time being, being of the
house of correction, called Bridewell in
London, in manner and forme following,
that


that is to say, When any such Boy is
taken up by my Executor or his As-
signes, in any place within the liberties
of this Citie of London, and by the Trea-
surer of the same House of Correction,
and Governours there for the time be-
ing, placed and bound Apprentice with
a Master, for the terme of seven yeeres
at the least, with a Master or Art-ma-
sters, as Glovers, Pinners, Shoomakers,
or any other occupation of Art, which
they shall bee thought most fit for, to
learne in the said house; whereby (in
time) they may prove good members,
and live like honest men in the Com-
mon-wealth. I say, with every one of
these Boyes shall be paid to the Treasu-
rer and Governours for the time being;
the summe of five pounds, untill the
said summe of two hundred pounds bee
fully paid for that use.
Item,
50. pound for S. Ma-
ries
in Reading.
I give and bequeath towards
the finishing of the Pinacles of the Stee-
ple of the Parish of Saint Maries in Rea-
ding
, in Berkshire, fifty pounds; to bee
paid to the Churchwardens of the same
Parish, within one moneth after the
same Pinacles shall be finished.
Item,
Five hun-
dred pounds to be lent to severall parties in Reading.
I give and bequeath to the
Maior and Burgesses of the Towne of
Reading aforesaid, the summe of five
hundred pounds, to be first lent to these
parties, and in the summes hereafter na-
med, for seven yeeres, gratis: That is,
to Iames Winche, two hundred pounds:
and to Walter Rye, Richard Stampe, and
William Blacknall, Clothiers, one hun-
dred pounds apiece: each of them gi-
ving Bond with two sufficient sureties,
for repayment thereof to the said Mai-
or and Burgesses, at the end of the said
seven yeeres. And afterwards, the same
five hundred pounds shall be lent to ten
severall honest industrious poore Clo-
thiers, free men of the same Towne, by
fifty pounds apiece, gratis, for three
yeeres, upon like good security: and no
man to have the use of this money twise.
But if there shal not be Clothiers enow
found in the said Towne,
For lacke of Clo-
thiers, the same mo-
ney lent to other Trades-
men of the same Towne.
to enjoy this
loane in manner aforesaid: That then
the said money shall bee lent also unto
other Tradesmen, free of the said Town,
by the summes and termes of yeeres last
before appointed; to such as set most
poore people aworke, according to the
discretion of the said Maior and Bur-
gesses: And this said summe of five
hundred pounds shall be paid to the
said Maior and Burgesses, (to the use a-
foresaid) at the end of one yeere next
after my decease.
Item,
Other five hun-
dred pounds to Clothiers of Newbury lent freely
I give and bequeath to the Mai-
or, Aldermen and Burgesses of the
Towne of Newbury, in the County of
Berks, the sum of five hundred pounds,
to be lent first for the terme of seven
yeeres, gratis, unto these severall Clo-
thiers here named; that is to say, To
Thomas Newman, one hundred pounds:
to Richard Avery, one hundred pounds:
to Martin Broaker, fifty pounds: to Wil-
liam Goodwin
the elder
, fifty pounds: to
Timothy Avery, fifty pounds: to Robert
Bacon
, fifty pounds: and to Griffin For-
ster
, fifty pounds. Every of the said se-
verall parties entring into bond, with 2.
sufficient sureties, for repayment of the
said summes to the said Maior and Al-
dermen and Burgesses at the end of se-
ven yeeres. And afterwards, the same
five hundred pounds shall be lent to ten
severall honest industrious poore Clo-
thiers,
To tenne other poore Clothiers the same money lent after-
wards.
free of the said Towne of Newbu-
rie
, by fifty pounds apiece, gratis, for
three yeeres: And after that in like man-
ner, from three yeers to three yeeres for
ever; and no man to have the same mo-
ney twise. But if there shall not bee
Clothiers enow found in the same
Towne of Newbury, to enjoy this loane
in manner as aforesaid; then the same
money shall bee lent also unto other
Tradesmen, free of the same Towne, by
the summes and termes of yeeres last
before appointed, to such as set most
poore people on worke, according to
the discretion of the said Maior, Alder-
men and Burgesses; to whom this said
five hundred pounds shall bee paid, to
the use aforesaid, at the end of one yeere
after my decease.
Item,
Nine hundred pounds given to the Mer-
chant Ad-
venturers
.
I give and bequeath to the Go-
vernour, Assistants, and fellowship of
Merchant Adventures of England, the
summe of nine hundred pounds, to bee
lent by three hundred pounds in a par-
cell, for three yeeres, gratis, unto three
honest, industrious and frugall young
men, free of that Company, none of
them being partners with each other;
and every of them giving Bond with
two


two sufficient sureties, to be tryed and
allowed by ballotting, and not other-
wise, for repayment of the same money
to the said Company. And so the same
money to be lent out by the said Com-
pany in this manner, from three yeeres
to three yeeres, for ever.
And my will and desire is, that these
my five present servants,
His ser-
vants first preferred to the be-
nefit of the loane.
shall be (upon
security as aforesaid) first preferred to
the enjoying of this loane; to wit, Wil-
liam Powle
, Thomas Newman
, and Simon
Gundy
, the first three yeeres; and An-
drew Kendricke
and Christopher Pack, the
next two parcels that shall come in, and
be received in, after they shall be free-
men of that Company. And for perfor-
mance hereof, the said nine hundred
pounds shall be paid unto the Treasurer
of the said Company in London, for the
time being, at the end of one yeere next
after my decease.
Item,
To his Brother William Kendrick and his children.
I give and bequeath to my bro-
ther William Kendrick of Reading in the
County of Berks, Clothier, and to his
Children now borne and living, the
summe of two thousand pounds: wher-
of one third part for himselfe, and the
other two parts for his said Children.
The same two third parts of the said
summe of two thousand pounds, to be
equally divided to and amongst his said
children, share and share like.
And my will is, that the said two
thousand pounds bee paid to my said
brother,
Payment of the two thousand pounds to his Bro-
ther and children, and how.
at the end of three yeeres next
after my decease: and that he shall pay
his said children their severall shares
thereof before limited; that is to say, to
his Sonne his share and part, when he
commeth to the age of twenty foure
yeeres: And to his Daughter, her share
and part, when she commeth to the age
of one and twenty yeeres, or at the day
of her marriage, which shall first hap-
pen.
And if it fortune either of my said
brothers children to dye or decease, be-
fore their respective Legacies aforesaid
shall grow due,
For mor-
tality in either of the chil-
dren.
as above; that then the
part of such child so deceasing, shall ac-
crue and be paid to the surviver of the
said children, at the day and time before
appointed.
Item,
The gift of his gold Ring.
I give and bequeath to my said
brother William Kendrick, my gold Ring
which was my Fathers; with the Let-
ters T. K. therein engraven, and a knot
betweene the same Letters.
Item, I give and bequeath to my Si-
ster Anne Newman of Reading in the
Country of Berks,
A thou-
sand Markes given to his sister.
the sum of one thou-
sand Marks, to be paid unto her at the
end of one yeere next after my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath unto the
Children of my said Sister,
Two thousand Markes given to his Sisters children, and in what man-
ner.
Anne New-
man
, the sum of two thousand Markes;
to bee equally divided amongst them
share and share like. And the shares of
such as are already married (if they be
Daughters) or are foure and twenty
yeeres of age, to bee paid them at the
end of one yeere after my decease. And
the shares of the rest, to be paid to such
as be Sonnes; when they shall be foure
and twenty yeeres of age. And to the
Daughters, at their day of marriage;
or when they shall come to one and
twenty yeeres of age respectively,
which of these shall happen to bee
first.
And if it shall happen any of the said
Children of my said Sister to dye, be-
fore the age and time so prefixed for
payment,
In case of morta-
lity or death hap-
pening a-
mong the children.
as aforesaid (I meane, those
that be yet under that age, and unmar-
ried) then my will is: That the share
and part of such as shall so dye, shall ac-
crue and bee paid unto the rest of the
same Children then surviving, share
and share like; and at the dayes and
times of payment before appointed,
for their own severall shares and parts.
But my will and meaning is, that
Thomas Newman, son of my said Sister;
shall not have any part or share of this
said Legacy of two thousand Markes:
Thomas Newman excepted from this Legacy.

because I give him a large Legacy apart
by this my will. Therefore the said two
thousand Markes is to bee divided and
shared among the rest of the Children
of my said Sister, as aforesaid.
Item, I doe hereby absolutely acquit
and forgive my brother in law Thomas
Newman
,
A Bond forgiven to his Si-
sters hus-
band.
of Reading aforesaid, husband
to my Sister Anne Newman; the summe
of one hundred Markes, which he ow-
eth me by his bond, due the second day
of November, An. Dom. 1623
. being all
that he oweth me at the date of this my
will.
Item, I give and bequeath to my
Sister


Sister Alice Vigures of Excester,
Five hun-
dred pounds given to his Sister Alice Vi-
gures
.
in the
County of Devon, the summe of five
hundred pounds; to be paid her at the
end of two yeeres next after my de-
cease.
Item, I give and bequeath to the
children of my said Sister Alice Vigures
the summe of one thousand pounds,
A thou-
sand pounds given to his said Sisters Children, and in what man-
ner.
to
be equally divided among them share
and share like. And if any of them be-
ing Sonnes) bee of the age of foure and
twenty yeeres; or any of them (being
Daughters) bee of the age of one and
twenty yeeres, or married, then the
share and parts of such respectively,
shall bee paid at the end of two yeeres
next after my decease. And the shares
and parts of the rest, shall bee paid to
such as are Sonnes, at the age of foure
and twenty yeeres: and to such as bee
Daughters, at their age of one and
twenty yeeres, or at the dayes of their
marriage, which of them shall first hap-
pen to come respectively.
But my will and meaning is, that Si-
mon Gandy
, Sonne of my said Sister A-
lice Vigures
,
Simon Gan-
dy
exclu-
ded from this thou-
sand pounds and the intent of this distri-
bution.
shall not have any part or
share of this Legacy of one thousand
pounds: because I give him a large Le-
cy apart by himselfe in this my Will.
But my meaning is, that this said Le-
gacy of one thousand pounds, so given
as aforesaid, shall bee equally divided
among the rest of the Children of my
said Sister; excluding the said Simon
Gandy
from all part and share of the
same: And if it shall happen any of the
said Children of my said Sister Alice
Gandy
, to dye before the age and time
of payment appointed as aforesaid (I
meane, when they bee under that age,
and unmarried:) then my will and
meaning is, that the share and part of
such as shall so dye; shall bee paid and
accrue unto the rest of the same Chil-
dren so surviving,
In case of mortality and death of the Children.
to each of them e-
qually, and share and share like: and
at the dayes and times of payment be-
fore appointed, for their owne severall
shares and parts.
Item, I give and bequeath to my
Brother Iames Winche of Parley in the
County of Berks,
To his Brother Iames VVinche, and his Children.
and to his Children,
the summe of one thousand pounds:
whereof one third part for himselfe, the
other two third parts for his said Chil-
dren. The same two third parts to bee
divided equally amongst the said Chil-
dren of my said Brother, share and
share like.
And my will is, that this said summe
of one thousand pounds,
The pay-
ment of this thou-
sand pounds to his Bro-
ther and Children.
shall bee paid
to my said Brother Iames Winche, at the
end of one yeere next after my decease,
and that hee shall pay forthwith unto
such of this Children, as (being sonnes,
and of the age of foure and twenty
yeeres, or married) their severall shares
and proportions of the said two third
parts of this summe of one thousand
pounds. The shares and parts of the
rest of his Children, hee shall retaine
in his owne hands, untill his said Chil-
dren (being Sonnes) shall be of the age
of foure and twenty yeeres: And being
Daughters, shall bee of the age of one
and twenty yeeres, or be married; and
then he shall pay every of them their se-
verall shares and parts respectively.
And if it shall happen any of the said
younger Children to dye,
In case of death and mortality of the younger Children.
before the
time of payment so limited as aforesaid:
Then my will and meaning is, that the
part and share of such as shal so decease
shall accrue unto the rest of the said
Children of my said Brother, that shall
then survive; to bee equally divided
amongst them share and sharelike, and
to bee paid at the daies and times be-
fore appointed.
Item, I give and bequeath to thirty
of my poorest Kindred in the Towne of
Reading in Barkshire,
Three hundred pounds to his poo-
rest Kin-
dred in Reading.
the summe of three
hundred pounds, to bee paid unto my
Brother William Kendrick, within three
moneths after my decease. And by him
to be distributed by ten pounds in every
parcell, as hee in his discretion shall
thinke good: wherein I pray him to be
very carefull, to bestow the same where
there is most need and best desert.
Item,
Fifty pounds to old Eliza-
beth Ken-
dricke
of Reading.
I give and bequeath to old E-
lizabeth Kendrick
of Reading, Daughter
to my Fathers Brother William Kendrick
to be paid her within three moneths af-
ter my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath to my
Kinseman Thomas Newman, now resi-
ding at Delft in Holland, the summe of
one thousand pounds. To be paid him
upon the five and twenty day of October
which


which shall be in the yeere of our Lord
God, 1626.
To Thomas Newman of Delft in Holland.
when his time of service ex-
pireth. Provided, that he remaine with
my partner Mr. Laurence Halstead, and
serve him his said full time.
Item,
One thou-
sand pounds to Simon Gan¦dy.
I give and bequeath to my
kinsman and late servant, Simon Gandy,
the summe of one thousand pounds, to
be paid him within one yeere next after
my decease.
Item,
Five hundred pounds to Arthur Aynscombe.
I give and bequeath unto Ar-
thur Aynscombe
, Merchant, now residing
at Antwerp; who hath a share with me
in trade; the summe of five hundred
pounds, to be paid him within 2. yeeres
after my decease. Provided that he goe
forward in trade with Mr. Laurence Hal-
stead
, (if he the said Master Halstead
shall desire it) unto the end of our Con-
tract, which will be the five and twen-
tieth day of October, Anno Dom. 1626
.
Item,
Five hundred pounds to Barney Reymer.
I give and bequeath to Barney
Reymer
, Merchant, now residing at
Delft, who hath also a share with me in
trade; the sum of five hundred pounds,
to be paid him within two yeeres next
after my decease. Provided that hee
goe forward in trade with Mr. Laurence
Halstead
, (if he the said Mr. Halstead shal
desire it) unto the end of our contract,
which will bee the five and twentieth
day of October, Anno Dom. 1626. as is
above-said.
Item,
Five hundred pounds to his Master Io. Quarles, living in the house.
I give and bequeath to Master
Iohn Quarles, who was my Master, the
summe of five hundred pounds, to bee
paid him within a yeere next after my
decease. And my earnest request unto
Mr. Laurence Halstead is, that unto the
end of our contract of Partnership,
(which will be the five and twentieth
day of October, Anno Domini 1626
.) the
same Mr. Quarles may have his dyet,
lodging and washing, in his the said Mr.
Halsteads house, free, and without pay-
ing any thing therefore, as he now hath
it with me. And my desire also is, that
he may continue to keepe the bookes of
our partable account, untill the aforesaid
twenty fifth day of October, 1626. and
be paid his wonted yeerely allowance of
fifty pounds for the same. And I doe
hereby freely and absolutely forgive the
said Mr. Iohn Quarles, the summe of
three hundred pounds, which he oweth
me, payable at pleasure, being lent him
the last of March, Anno 1615. and being
all that he oweth me at the date of this
my Will.
Item,
Three hundred pounds to Mr. George Lowe.
I give and bequeath to Master
George Lowe, heretofore my partner, the
summe of three hundred pounds, to bee
paid him within one yeere next after my
decease. And I doe hereby absolutely
forgive him, all that is due unto me for
his lodging, diet, firing and washing,
which he hath had of me now six yeeres
together.
Item,
Two hun-
dred li. to Thomas Bilingsley.
I give and bequeath to Thomas
Billingsley
, sonne of Sir Henry Bilingsley,
Knight, and Alderman of London, de-
ceased, the sum of two hundred pounds,
to be paid him within one yeere next af-
ter my decease. And I doe absolutely
forgive him the summe of two hundred
pounds, which hee oweth mee by his
Bond, due the twentieth of December,
Anno, 1625
. and lent him the twentieth
of this present Moneth, for a yeere.
Item,
300. li. to Thomas Iacksons Executors▪
I give and bequeath to the Exe-
cutors of Thomas Iackson, of London,
Merchant, deceased (whom I take to be
Miles Iackson, the sonne of the said Tho-
mas
)
the sum of three hundred pounds,
to be paid at the end of one yeere next
after my decease.
Item,
50. li. to Lucas van Peenen.
I give and bequeath to Lucas
van Peenen
of Middleburgh in Zealand,
sonne of Roger van Peenen of that Town,
deceased; the summe of fifty pounds
sterling, to be paid over by Exchange,
within two moneths after my decease:
Payable at Vsance to Iohn Mount-Ste-
phen
, now residing in that Towne, to be
paid over to the said Lucas van Peenen,
forthwith after he hath received it, in
the full Flemmish summe which the same
shall produce.
Item,
20. pound 10 Ieremias Poets of Middle-burgh.
I give and bequeath to Iremias
Poets
, of the same Towne of Middle-burgh
in Zealand, (if he be the Execu-
tor of his brother Hance Poets, decea-
sed) the summe of twenty pounds ster-
ling: to be made over by Exchange
within two moneths after my decease.
Payable at Vsance, to Iohn Mount-Ste-
phen
aforenamed; and by him forthwith
(after his receipt thereof) to be paid o-
ver to the said Ieremias Poets, in the full
Flemmish summe which the same shall
produce.
Item, I give and bequeath to William
Powle,

Powle my covenant Servant,
Two hundred pounds to his ser-
vant Wil-
liam Powle
.
the summe
of two hundred pounds: to bee paid
him within sixe moneths after my de-
cease.
Item, I give and bequeath to Andrew
Kendricke
my Apprentice,
Three hundred pounds to his Ap-
prentice Andrew Kendricke.
the summe
of three hundred pounds: to bee paid
him, when hee shall have served seven
yeeres, from the commencement of the
terme of his Indenture.
Item, I give and bequeath to the
said Andrew Kendricke,
One hundred pounds more to the same person.
the summe of
one hundred pounds more: in lieu of so
much given mee with him by his Fa-
ther Iohn Kendricke; to bee paid him
within three moneths next after my de-
cease, upon acquittance to be given by
his said Father therefore.
Item,
To Christo-
pher Pack
his Ap-
prentice one hun-
dred pounds.
I give and bequeath to Chri-
stopher Packe
mine Apprentice, the sum
of one hundred pounds: to bee payed
him within three months next after my
decease.
Item,
Twenty pounds to his Horse-keeper.
I give and bequeath to Thomas
Mayle
my Horse-keeper, the summe of
twenty pounds: to be paid him within
two moneths next after my decease.
Item,
Twenty pounds to his Maid Dorothy,
I give and bequeath to my
Maid Dorothy, the summe of twenty
pounds; to bee paid her within two
moneths next after my decease.
Item,
Twenty pounds to his Maid Margaret.
I give and bequeath to my
Maid Margaret the summe of twenty
pounds; to bee paid her within two
moneths next after my decease.
Item,
To his Drawer Hutwith fif-
ty pounds.
I give and bequeath unto
Iohn Hutwith my Drawer, the summe of fif-
ty pounds; to be paid him within three
moneths after my decease.
Item,
To his Drawer Bird five and twen-
ty pounds.
I give and bequeath to Walter
Bird
my Drawer, five and twenty
pounds; to bee paid him within three
moneths after my decease.
Item,
Among the ser-
vants of Hutwith twenty five pound▪
I give and bequeath to the pre-
sent men servants of Iohn Hutwith my
Drawer, the summe of twenty five
pounds; whereoften pounds to Charles,
and the other fifteene pounds to bee e-
qually divided amongst the rest, as well
Apprentices as Journeymen; to bee
paid within two months next after my
decease.
Item,
To his twelve Cloth-
workers, 130. pounds.
I give and bequeath to my
twelve Clothworkers, that usually row
and sheere my Clothes; the summe of
one hundred and thirty pounds: where-
of twenty pounds to Owen Dobbins, and
ten pounds a peece to the rest; to bee
payed within three moneths next after
my decease.
Item,
To Bigge and Salis-
bury
25. pounds.
I give and bequeath to William
Bigge
and William Salisbury, that usually
presse and fold my Clothes; the sum
of twenty five pounds: whereof fifteen
pounds to William Bigge, and ten pounds
to William Salisbury, to bee paid them
within three moneths next after my de-
cease.
Item,
To his Porters twenty pounds.
I give and bequeath to my Por-
ters at the waterside, ten pounds, to be
equally divided among them. And ten
pounds to my Porters, that usually pack
in my house; to bee paid within two
moneths next after my decease.
Item,
Tenne pounds to his Water-bearer and Wa-
sher.
I give and bequeath to my Wa-
ter-bearer three pounds: And to my
Washer Anthony five pounds, to be paid
them forthwith after my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath to William
Beadle
of Reading Clothier,
To VVil-
liam Bea-
dle
of Rea-
ding
50. pounds.
the summe
of fifty pounds, if he be yet living; and
if he be dead; then to his Executors: to
to be paid within three moneths next
after my decease. And I doe hereby
also forgive the said William Beadle the
ten pounds he now oweth me.
Item,
To Slye of Readings Executors 50. li.
I give and bequeath to the Ex-
ecutors of Mark Slye of Reading Clothier
deceased, the summe of fifty pounds;
to be paid within three moneths next
after my decease.
Item,
100. li. to Newman of Newbury.
I give and bequeath to Thomas
Newman
of Newbury Clothier, the sum
of one hundred pounds, to be paid him
within three moneths after my de-
cease.
Item,
100. li. to John Skin-
ner
.
I give and bequeath to Iohn
Skinner
, Secretary to the Merchants
Adventurers; the summe of one hun-
dred pounds, to bee paid within three
moneths next after my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath to the
Widdow Harison and her Daughter,
dwelling in the Alley next to my dwel-
ling house,
To Wid-
dow Hari-
son
and her daugh¦ter five pounds.
five pounds, to be paid with-
in one moneth next after my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath to Master
Richard Bennet,
To Master Bennet 300. li.
who was heretofore my
Partner, the summe of three hundred
pounds, to bee paid at the end of one
yeere next after my decease.
Item, I give and bequeath to Master
William Towerson Skinner,
Tenne pounds to make two Rings.
Deputy of
the Merchant Adventurers, five pounds
to make him a Ring. And to Master
Thomas Smith Skinner, five pounds to
make him a Ring; to bee paid them
forthwith after my decease.
Item,
To three men five pound a peece.
I give and bequeath unto Rafe
Barnet
, William Ellets
and Iohn Southern
Officers of the Merchant Adventurers,
five pounds a peece; to bee paid them
forthwith after my decease.
Item,
For Ser-
vice by six a clocke every mor-
ning at Reading.
I give and bequeath to the
Maior and Burgesses of the Towne of
Reading, in the County of Berks; the
sum of two hundred and fifty pounds;
to be paid them at the end of one yeere
next after my decease: Therewith to
purchase Lands and Hereditaments, to
the cleare yeerely value of ten pounds
for ever; to maintaine Divine Service
to be said in the Parish Church of St.
Mary in that Towne, by the Parson or
his Curate every morning of the week,
at sixe of the clocke for ever.
Item,
For the like Di-
vine Ser-
vice eve-
ry mor-
ning at Newbury.
I give and bequeath to the
Maior, Aldermen and Burgesses of the
Town of Newbury, in the County of
Berks, the sum of two hundred and fifty
pounds, to bee paid them at the end of
one yeere next after my decease: Ther-
with to purchase Lands or Heredita-
ments, of the cleare yeerely value of
ten pounds for ever; to maintaine Di-
vine Service to bee said in the Parish
Church of that Towne by the Parson or
his Curate, every morning of the week
at sixe of the clocke, to continue for e-
ver.
Item,
To his Kinseman Bye 100. li.
I give and bequeath to my
Kinseman William Bye, dwelling neere
the Allum Mines in Yorkeshire, the
summe of one hundred pounds; to
bee paid him within three moneths
after my decease. And I doe here-
by forgive him the tenne pounds,
which hee oweth me by his Bond, due
long since.
Item,
Forty pounds for his fu-
nerall din-
ner at Drapers Hall.
I give and bequeath to the
Company of Drapers in London, the
summe of forty pounds, to be bestowed
upon a dinner for the Livery of that
Company, to be at their Hall upon the
day of my buriall: This to bee paid
forthwith after my decease.
And my will and meaning is, that
in case any of the persons aforenamed,
to whom I have bequathed Legacies
as aforesaid,
Dispositi-
on of the Legacies, if any studye in the meane time.
and not especially dispo-
sed for case of their decease, shall hap-
pen to dye before the same Legacies
grow due unto them. Then the Le-
gacie or Legacies so by mee given to
them as aforesaid, shall bee paid un-
to their Executors or Administra-
tors, at such time as I have before
severally appointed unto them my Le-
gataries.
And I doe make and ordaine my
loving Friend and Partner,
Appoint-
ment of his Execu-
tor.
Master
Laurence Halstead, my sole Executor,
of this my last Will and Testament:
Charging him, as hee will answer it
before Almighty GOD at the last
Day of Judgement, that hee truly
and punctually (in every particular)
performe this my said last VVill and
Testament; as I nothing doubt but
hee will bee carefull to doe it.
The rest of his e-
states to his Exe-
cutor.
Here-
by giving and bequeathing unto him
my said Executor, all the residue and
remainder of my estate; my Legacies
before bequeathed being first payed
and discharged.
In witnesse of the premisses, I have
unto this my last Will and Testament,
contained in eighteene severall sheets
of Paper, put my hand and Seale.
That is, my Seale once at the top,
and my name under every severall
sheete, the day and yeere first above
written.
John Kendricke.
Sealed, pronounced and deli-
vered by the said Iohn
Kendricke
, as his last
Will and Testament, in the
presence of us,
Iohn Skinner.
Andrew Kendricke.
Thomas Singleton.
West from this Church have yee
Scolding Alley, of old time called Scal-
ding house
, or Scalding wicke, because
that ground (for the most part) was
then


then imployed by Poulterers, that
dwelled in the high street, from the
Stockes Market to the great Conduit.
Their Poultrie which they sold at their
stalles, were scalded there: the street
doth yet beare the name of the Poultrie,
and the Powlterers are but lately depar-
ted from thence into other streets, as in-
to Grasse-street, and the ends of S. Ni-
cholas
flesh shambles
.
This Scalding wicke is the farthest
part of Broadstreet Ward, and is (by
the water called Walbrooke) parted from
Cheap Ward.
This Broadstreet Ward hath an Alder-
man, with his Deputy, Common Coun-
sellors, ten, Constables, ten; Scavengers,
eight; Wardmote inquest, thirteen, and
a Beadle. It is taxed to the Fifteene in
London, at seven and twenty pounds, and
accounted in the Exchequer after twen-
ty five pounds.
T

Notes

  1. John Paulet. (KL)
  2. This likely refers to Martin Calthorp. (KL)
  3. Celebrated on 24 June. (KL)
  4. According to MASL, there is no evidence that John Dent was a sheriff. (KL)

References

  • Stow, John, and William fitz-Stephen. Survey of London: Broad Street Ward. The Map of Early Modern London, edited by Janelle Jenstad, U of Victoria, 26 Jun. 2020, mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1598_BROA3.htm.

Cite this page

MLA citation

Stow, John, Anthony Munday, Anthony Munday, and Humphrey Dyson. The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward. The Map of Early Modern London, edited by Janelle Jenstad, U of Victoria, 26 Jun. 2020, mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm.

Chicago citation

Stow, John, Anthony Munday, Anthony Munday, and Humphrey Dyson. The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed June 26, 2020. https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm.

APA citation

Stow, J., Munday, A., Munday, A., & Dyson, H. 2020. The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward. In J. Jenstad (Ed), The Map of Early Modern London. Victoria: University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm.

RIS file (for RefMan, EndNote etc.)

Provider: University of Victoria
Database: The Map of Early Modern London
Content: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

TY  - ELEC
A1  - Stow, John
A1  - Munday, Anthony
A1  - Munday, Anthony
A1  - Dyson, Humphrey
ED  - Jenstad, Janelle
T1  - The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward
T2  - The Map of Early Modern London
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/06/26
CY  - Victoria
PB  - University of Victoria
LA  - English
UR  - https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm
UR  - https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/xml/standalone/stow_1633_BROA3.xml
ER  - 

RefWorks

RT Web Page
SR Electronic(1)
A1 Stow, John
A1 Munday, Anthony
A1 Munday, Anthony
A1 Dyson, Humphrey
A6 Jenstad, Janelle
T1 The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward
T2 The Map of Early Modern London
WP 2020
FD 2020/06/26
RD 2020/06/26
PP Victoria
PB University of Victoria
LA English
OL English
LK https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm

TEI citation

<bibl type="mla"><author><name ref="#STOW6"><surname>Stow</surname>, <forename>John</forename></name></author>, <author><name ref="#MUND1"><forename>Anthony</forename> <surname>Munday</surname></name></author>, <author><name ref="#MUND1"><forename>Anthony</forename> <surname>Munday</surname></name></author>, and <author><name ref="#DYSO1"><forename>Humphrey</forename> <surname>Dyson</surname></name></author>. <title level="a">The Survey of London (1633): Broadstreet Ward</title>. <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>, edited by <editor><name ref="#JENS1"><forename>Janelle</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></name></editor>, <publisher>U of Victoria</publisher>, <date when="2020-06-26">26 Jun. 2020</date>, <ref target="https://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm">mapoflondon.uvic.ca/stow_1633_BROA3.htm</ref>.</bibl>

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