Undergraduate student contribution

How to Use Project Gutenberg

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This guide to using Project Gutenberg was one of several guides written for students by students working under the supervision of Dr. Kristen A. Bennett. These how to resources for conducting digital, archival, and worldwide library research across topics in early modern English literature were created by undergraduate students in the Spring 2014, ENG 304 class, Subversion and Scandal in Early Modern Print Culture with the help of the Faculty Initiatives in Technology grant at Stonehill College. Dr. Bennett and her students kindly gave MoEML permission to republish their guides. Click here for guides to Early English Books Online, the English Broadside Ballad Archive, the Folger Digital Archive, , and the Internet Shakespeare Editions. To see the guides in their original context, along with other materials, visit the English 304 blog.

About Project Gutenberg

Project Gutenberg is a volunteer-run digital archive that contains over 45,000 free eBooks in various formats. Founded by Michael S. Hart in 1971, Project Gutenberg is the oldest digital library in use today. Online contributors upload, proofread, edit, and provide footnotes to the texts.

How to Navigate Project Gutenberg

To access Project Gutenberg, enter the URL http://www.gutenberg.org/ into your web browser. The folllowing instructions describe how to navigate Project Gutenberg, emphasizing sections and features that may be of interest to students.
Screen capture of search results for Much Ado About Nothing on Project Gutenberg.
Screen capture of search results for Much Ado About Nothing on Project Gutenberg.
Screen capture of The Works of William Shakespeare on Project Gutenberg.
Screen capture of The Works of William Shakespeare on Project Gutenberg.
1. Search
  • On the home page, enter the name of the text you are looking for in the text box labelled search book catalog in the upper right-hand corner and press enter.
  • Your search results will appear on a new page. Based on the information provided for each result, you can select the text(s) you are interested in.
2. Browse
  • To browse through a genre, click on the link labelled book categories in the left-hand side column. This link leads to an alphabetized bookshelf with categories that range from architecture to psychology.
3. Individual Entries
  • Once you have selected a text, you will be directed to a new page that lists bibliographic information for the text and available format(s).
  • Select the format in which you would like to open the text. Possible formats may include HTML, EPUB, Kindle, Plain Text
Export to RefWorks
RIS file (for RefMan, EndNote etc.)

MLA citation:

“How to Use Project Gutenberg.” The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Web. 30 March 2017. <http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/project_gutenberg_guide.htm>.

Chicago citation:

“How to Use Project Gutenberg.” n.d. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed March 30, 2017. http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/project_gutenberg_guide.htm.

APA citation:

How to Use Project Gutenberg. (n.d.). In J. Jenstad (Ed.), The Map of Early Modern London. Retrieved March 30, 2017, from http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/project_gutenberg_guide.htm

TEI citation:

<bibl> <title level="a">How to Use Project Gutenberg</title>. (<date>n.d.</date>). In <editor><persName><forename>J.</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></persName></editor> (Ed.), <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>. Retrieved <date when="2017-03-30">March 30, 2017</date>, from <ref target="http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/project_gutenberg_guide.htm">http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/project_gutenberg_guide.htm</ref> </bibl>