Whitefriars

This page points to the district known as Whitefriars. For the theatre, see Whitefriars Theatre.
For an important and growing body of research about the sanctuary or liberty of Whitefriars, colloquially known as Alsatia, named after Alsace, see John Levin’s Alsatia: The Debtor Sanctuaries of London. See also: Chalfant 198-99.

Cite this page

MLA citation

Whitefriars. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Web. 09 April, 2018. <http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm>.

Chicago citation

Whitefriars. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed April 09, 2018. http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm.

APA citation

2018. Whitefriars. In J. Jenstad (Ed), The Map of Early Modern London. Victoria: University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm

RIS file (for RefMan, EndNote etc.)

Provider: University of Victoria
Database: The Map of Early Modern London
Content: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

TY  - ELEC
ED  - Jenstad, Janelle
T1  - Whitefriars
T2  - The Map of Early Modern London
PY  - 2018
DA  - 2018/04/09
CY  - Victoria
PB  - University of Victoria
LA  - English
UR  - http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm
UR  - http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/xml/standalone/WHIT4.xml
ER  - 

RefWorks

RT Web Page
SR Electronic(1)
A6 Jenstad, Janelle
T1 Whitefriars
T2 The Map of Early Modern London
WP 2018
FD 2018/04/09
RD 2018/04/09
PP Victoria
PB University of Victoria
LA English
OL English
LK http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm

TEI citation

<bibl type="mla"> <title level="a">Whitefriars</title>. <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>. Ed. <editor><name ref="#JENS1"><forename>Janelle</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></name></editor>. <pubPlace>Victoria</pubPlace>: <publisher>University of Victoria</publisher>. Web. <date when="2018-04-09">09 April, 2018</date>. <ref target="http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm">http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/WHIT4.htm</ref>.</bibl>

Personography

Locations

  • Whitefriars Theatre

    One of the lesser known halls or private playhouses of Renaissance London, the Whitefriars, was home to two different boy playing companies, each of which operated under several different names. Whitefriars produced many famous boy actors, some of whom later went on to greater fame in adult companies. At the Whitefriars playhouse in 1607–1608, the Children of the King’s Revels catered to a homogenous audience with a particular taste for homoerotic puns and situations, which resulted in a small but significant body of plays that are markedly different from those written for the amphitheatres and even for other hall playhouses.

    Whitefriars Theatre is mentioned in the following documents:

Mentions of this place in Internet Shakespeare Editions texts

Variant spellings