Bridge Without Ward

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HAuing treated of Wardes in London, on the North ſide of the Thames (in number 25.) I am now to croſſe ouer the ſaid Riuer into the Borough of Southwark, which is alſo a Warde of London, without the walles, on the South ſide thereof, as is Portſoken on the Eaſt, and Faringdon extra on the Weſt.
This Borough being in the County of Surrey, conſiſteth of diuers ſtreetes, wayes, and winding lanes, all full of buildings, inhabited: and firſt to begin at the WEſt part thereof, ouer againſt the weſt Suburbe of the Citie.
On the banke of the Riuer Thames there is now a continuall building of tenements, about halfe a mile in length to the bridge. Then from the Bridge ſtraight towards the South a continuall ſtreete, called long Southwarke, builded on both ſides with diuers lanes and alleyes up to S. Georges church, and beyond it through Blackman ſtreete towardes New Town (or Newington) the liberties of which Borough extend almoſt to the parriſh Church of New town aforeſaid, diſtant one mile from London Bridge, and alſo ſouthweſt a continuall building, almoſt to Lambeth more then one mile form the ſaid bridge.
Then from the bridge along bythe Thames Eaſtwarde, is ſaint Olaues ſtreet hauing continuall building on both the ſides, with lanes and alleyes up to Battle bridge, to Horſedowne, and towardes Rother hith: alſo ſome good halfe mile in length from London bridge.
So that I account the whole continual buildings on the banke of the ſaid riuer, from the weſt towardes the eaſt to be more then a large mile in length.
Then haue ye from the entering towards the ſaid Horſedown one other continuall ſtreete called Bermondes eye ſtreete, which ſtretcheth ſouth, likewiſe furniſhed with buildinges on both ſides, almoſt halfe a mile in length, up to the late diſſolued Monaſterie of S. Sauiour called Bermondſey. And from thence is one long lane (ſo called of the length) turning weſt to ſaint Georges church afore named. Out of which lane mentioned Long lane breaketh one other ſtreete towardes the ſouth and by eaſt, and this is called Kentiſh ſtreete for that is the way leading into that countrie: and ſo haue you the bounds of this Borough.

References

  • Stow, John. A Survey of London. Reprinted from the Text of 1603. Ed. Charles Lethbridge Kingsford. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon, 1908. Print. [Also available as a reprint from Elibron Classics (2001). Articles written before 2011 cite from the print edition by volume and page number.]
Last modification: 2014-10-01 16:23:09 -0700 (Wed, 01 Oct 2014) (mholmes)
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MLA citation:

“Bridge Without Ward.” The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Web. 21 November 2014. <http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/BRID4.htm>.

Chicago citation:

“Bridge Without Ward.” n.d. The Map of Early Modern London. Ed. Janelle Jenstad. Victoria: University of Victoria. Accessed November 21, 2014. http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/BRID4.htm.

APA citation:

Bridge Without Ward. (n.d.). In J. Jenstad (Ed.), The Map of Early Modern London. Retrieved November 21, 2014, from http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/BRID4.htm

TEI citation:

<bibl> <title level="a">Bridge Without Ward</title>. (<date>n.d.</date>). In <editor><persName><forename>J.</forename> <surname>Jenstad</surname></persName></editor> (Ed.), <title level="m">The Map of Early Modern London</title>. Retrieved <date when="2014-11-21">November 21, 2014</date>, from <ref target="http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/BRID4.htm">http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/BRID4.htm</ref> </bibl>